Etymology
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ladies (n.)

plural of lady (q.v.). Ladies' night (1880) originally was any event to which women were invited at an all-male club.

Every succeeding occasion is usually said to be "the best ever," but for true pleasure, comfort and genuine enjoyment it is doubtful if any occasion has been more truly "the best ever" than the ladies' night of the Paint, Oil and Varnish Club of Chicago, which was given in the Crystal ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Thursday evening January 26. ["Paint, Oil and Drug Review," Feb. 1, 1911]
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wash (n.)
late Old English wæsc "act of washing," from wash (v.). Meaning "clothes set aside to be washed" is attested from 1789; meaning "thin coat of paint" is recorded from 1690s; sense of "land alternately covered and exposed by the sea" is recorded from mid-15c.
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Colorado 

U.S. state (organized as a territory 1861, admitted as a state 1876), named for the river, Spanish Rio Colorado, from colorado "ruddy, reddish," literally "colored," past participle of colorar "to color, dye, paint," from Latin colorare "to color, to get tanned," from color "color of the skin, color in general" (see color (n.)).

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blazon (v.)
1560s, "to depict or paint (armorial bearings)," from blazon (n.) or else from French blasonner, from the noun in French. Earlier as "to set forth decriptively" (1510s); especially "to vaunt or boast" (1530s); in this use probably from or influenced by blaze (v.2).
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linseed (n.)
Old English linsæd "seed of flax," from līn "flax" (see linen) + sæd "seed" (see seed (n.)). Used in ancient times as a source of medical treatments, in later use to produce linseed oil, used in paint, ink, varnishes, etc.
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stripper (n.)
1580s, transitive, "person who strips" (the bark off trees, etc.), agent noun from strip (v.). Meaning "machine or appliance for stripping" is from 1835. Sense of "strip-tease dancer" is from 1930 (see strip-tease). Meaning "chemical for removing paint" is from 1937.
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raddle (v.)

"color coarsely with red or rouge," 1630s, from raddle (n.) "red ochre used as paint, layer of red pigment" (mid-14c.), fromrad, a variant of red. Related: Raddled, raddling.

                     As it were to dream of
morticians' daughters raddled but amorous
[Pound, from Canto LXXIV]
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fucus (n.)

algae genus, 1716, from Latin fucus, a type of reddish seaweed or rock-lichen, from or related to Greek phykos "seaweed," which is said to be of Semitic origin (see phyco-). From it was prepared in ancient times a red dye for woolen goods; hence in Greek and Latin it also had a sense "red paint" and was the general word for the article of women's make-up that supplied the place of rouge; and in Latin it was further extended to include "deceit, disguise." The custom is said to have originated among the Ionians, who were in close contact with Semitic peoples.

The word was in Middle English as fuke, fuike "dissimulation" (mid-15c.); "red woolen cloth" (late 15c.); later fucus "a paint, dye," especially for the face, "rouge," also commonly used 17c. figuratively as "disguise, pretense." Hence also obsolete fucate "disguised, dissembling" (1530s), literally "colored, beautified with paint," from Latin fucatus "painted, painted, colored, disguised," past-participle adjective from fucare, a verb derived from fucus.

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portrait (n.)

1560s, "a figure, drawn or painted," a back formation from portraiture or directly from French portrait, from Old French portret (13c.), noun use of past participle of portraire "to paint, depict" (see portray). Especially a picture or representation of the head and face of a person drawn from life. Related: Portraitist.

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grease (n.)

"oily fat of land animals," c. 1300, from Anglo-French grece, Old French gresse, craisse "grease, fat" (Modern French graisse), from Vulgar Latin *crassia "(melted) animal fat, grease," from Latin crassus "thick, solid, fat" (source also of Spanish grasa, Italian grassa), which is of unknown origin. Grease paint, used by actors, attested from 1880. Grease monkey "mechanic" is from 1918.

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