Etymology
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piggyback (adj.)

also piggy-back, "on the shoulders or back like a pack or bundle," 1823, probably a folk etymology alteration of colloquial pickapack, pick pack (1560s) "on the back or shoulders like a pack," which perhaps is from pick, a dialectal variant of pitch (v.1). As a verb, "to ride piggyback," by 1952.

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bale (v.)
"to pack up in bales," 1750, from bale (n.). Related: Baled; baling.
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packing (n.)

"any material used for filling an empty space," 1824, from pack (v.).

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fardel (n.)
"bundle, burden," c. 1300, from Old French fardel "parcel, package, small pack" (13c., Modern French fardeau), diminutive of farde, which OED says is "cognate with" (others say "from") Spanish fardo "pack, bundle," which is said to be from Arabic fardah "package."
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rats (interj.)

expressing incredulity, disappointment, annoyance, etc., 1886, American English, from rat (n.).

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murine (adj.)

"resembling a mouse or rat," c. 1600, from Latin murinus "of a mouse," from mus "mouse" (see mouse (n.)).

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caboodle (n.)
"crowd, pack, lot, company," 1848, see kit and caboodle.
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backpack (n.)

also back-pack, 1904, "bag with shoulder straps that allow it to be carried on a person's back," from back (n.) + pack (n.). By 1916 as a verb, "to hike while carrying supplies in a backpack." Related: Backpacked; backpacking.

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sooterkin (n.)
1680s, imaginary rat-like after-birth believed to be gotten by Dutch women by sitting over stoves, 1680s.
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Conrad 
masc. proper name, from Old High German Kuonrat, literally "bold in counsel," from kuon "bold" + rat "counsel" (see read (v.)).
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