Etymology
Advertisement
initialize (v.)
"to make ready for operation," 1957, from initial (adj.) + -ize. The same formation had been used earlier to mean "use initials instead of a name" (1837); "designate by initials" (1833). Related: Initialized; initializing; initialization (1957 in the modern sense).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
afoot (adv., adj.)
c. 1200, afote, "on foot, walking, not on horseback," contraction of prepositional phrase on fotum; see a- (1) "on" + foot (n.). Meaning "astir, on the move" is from 1520s; figurative sense of "in active operation" is from 1601 ("Julius Caesar").
Related entries & more 
master-mind (n.)

1720, "an outstanding intellect," from master (n.) + mind (n.). Meaning "head of a criminal enterprise" is attested by 1872. As a verb (also mastermind), "to engage in the highest level of planning and execution of a major operation," from 1940. Related: Masterminded; masterminding.

Related entries & more 
manifest (v.)
Origin and meaning of manifest

late 14c., "to spread" (one's fame), "to show plainly," from manifest (adj.) or else from Latin manifestare "to discover, disclose, betray." Meaning "to display by actions" is from 1560s; reflexive sense, of diseases, etc., "to reveal as in operation" is from 1808. Related: Manifested; manifesting.

Related entries & more 
mobilize (v.)

1833 in the military sense of "prepare for active operation or taking the field;" 1838 as "render capable of movement;" 1846 as "bring into readiness or circulation," from French mobiliser, from mobile "movable" (see mobile (adj.)). Related: Mobilized; mobilizing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lithotripsy (n.)
operation of crushing a stone in the bladder, 1834, from litho- "stone" + -tripsy, from Greek tripsis "rubbing, friction," from tribein "to rub, thresh, pound, wear out," from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn." Klein says the intended Greek word is thryptein "to crush" and there has been "confusion" with tribein.
Related entries & more 
excoriation (n.)

"act of flaying, operation of stripping off the skin," hence "act or process of abrading, removal of the outer layers of the skin," mid-15c., excoriacioun, from Medieval Latin excoriationem (nominative excoriatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin excoriare (see excoriate).

Related entries & more 
exsiccation (n.)

"act or operation of drying; evaporation of moisture," 1590s, from Late Latin exsiccationem "a drying up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin exsiccare "dry up, make quite dry," from ex "out" (see ex-) + siccare "make dry" (see siccative).

Related entries & more 
piecework (n.)

also piece-work, "work done and paid for by measure or quantity" in contradistinction to work done and paid for by measure of time, 1540s, from piece (n.1) + work (n.) in the sense of "a distinct job or operation taken separately." Related: Pieceworker.

Related entries & more 
educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
Related entries & more 

Page 4