Etymology
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intron (n.)

1978 in genetics, from intra-genic "occurring within a gene" + -on.

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whereon (adv.)

"on which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + on (adv.).

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logon 
in computer sense, as one word, by 1975, from log (v.2) + on (adv.).
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onward (adv.)

"toward the front or a point ahead, forward; forward in time," late 14c., from on + -ward. The form onwards, with adverbial genitive -s, is attested from c. 1600. As an adjective, "moving on or forward," 1670s.

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photon (n.)

"unit of electromagnetic radiation," 1926, from photo- "light" + -on "unit." Related: Photonic.

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thereon (adv.)
Old English þæron; see there + on. Similar formation in German daran.
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codon (n.)

"one of a group of nucleotides that determine which amino acid is inserted at a given position," 1962, from code (n.) + -on.

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interferon (n.)
animal protein, 1957, coined in English from interfere + subatomic particle suffix -on; so called because it "interferes" with the reduplication of viruses.
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onlooker (n.)

"spectator, one who observes but does not participate," c. 1600, from on + agent noun from look (v.). Old English had a verb onlocian, but the modern verb onlook (1867) appears to be a back-formation from onlooker.

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boson (n.)

class of subatomic particles which obeys Bose-Einstein statistics, by 1956, named for Indian physicist Satyendra Nath Bose (1894-1974) + subatomic particle suffix -on.

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