Etymology
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officiant (n.)

"one who conducts a religious service, one who administers a sacrament," 1836, from noun use of Medieval Latin officiantem (nominative officians) "performing religious services," present participle of officiare "to perform religious services," from Latin officium "a service; an official duty; ceremonial observance" (in Medieval Latin, "church service"); see office.

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officialese (n.)

"the language of officialdom," 1881, from official + -ese. Usually disparaging.

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trade-off (n.)
also tradeoff, "sacrifice of one benefit for another," 1959, from verbal phrase to trade off; see trade (v.) + off (adv.).
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offer (n.)

early 15c., offre, "a proposal presented for acceptance or rejection," from Old French ofre "act of offering; offer, proposition" (12c.), verbal noun from offrir "to offer," from Latin offerre "to present, bestow, bring before" (see offer (v.)). The native noun formation is offering. Meaning "act of proposing a price to obtain or do something" is from 1540s.

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off-road (adj.)

"used, meant to be used, or taking place away from roads," 1949, from off- (adj.) (see off (prep.)) + road.

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push-off (n.)

"act of pushing off" (a boat, from the land), 1902, from the verbal phrase; see push (v.) + off (adv.).

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tip-off (n.)
1901 in reference to information, from tip (v.2) + off (adv.). From 1924 in basketball, from tip (v.3).
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face-off (n.)
also faceoff, 1886 in sports (hockey, etc., originally lacrosse), from verbal phrase in a sports sense, attested from 1867 (see face (v.) + off (adv.)); the off perhaps is based on stand-off or similar constructions.
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lift-off (adj.)
"removable by lifting," 1907, from the verbal phrase, from lift (v.) + off (adv.)
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off-base (adv.)

"unawares," by 1936, American English, from off (adv.) + base (n.); a figurative extension from baseball sense of a runner being "not in the right position" (1882) and vulnerable to being picked off.

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