Etymology
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nycti- 

before vowels nyct-, word-forming element meaning "night," from Latinized form of Greek nykti-, a combining form of nyx "night" (see night).

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tonight (adv.)
Old English toniht "in the coming night," from to "at, on" (see to) + niht (see night). As a noun, "in the night after the present day," early 14c. Written as two words until 18c., after which it was to-night until early 20c.
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midnight (n.)

"the middle of the night, 12 o'clock at night," Old English mid-niht, or middre niht (with dative of adjective). See mid (adj.) + night. Compare similar formation in Old High German mittinaht, German Mitternacht. Midnight oil symbolizing "late night work" is attested from 1630s.

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nightspot (n.)
also night spot, "nightclub," 1936, from night (n.) + spot (n.) "place."
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nocturnal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the night, used or done at night," late 15c. (Caxton), from Old French nocturnal "nightly, nocturnal," or directly from Late Latin nocturnalis, from Latin nocturnus "belonging to the night," from nox (genitive noctis) "night," cognate with Old English neaht (see night) + -urnus, suffix forming adjectives of time. Related: Nocturnally. Nocturnal emission "involuntary ejaculation during sleep" is recorded by 1813.

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vision (n.)
c. 1300, "something seen in the imagination or in the supernatural," from Anglo-French visioun, Old French vision "presence, sight; view, look, appearance; dream, supernatural sight" (12c.), from Latin visionem (nominative visio) "act of seeing, sight, thing seen," noun of action from past participle stem of videre "to see," from PIE root *weid- "to see." The meaning "sense of sight" is first recorded late 15c. Meaning "statesman-like foresight, political sagacity" is attested from 1926.
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-rama 
noun suffix meaning "sight, view, spectacular display or instance of," 1824, abstracted from panorama (q.v.), ultimately from Greek horama "sight, spectacle, that which is seen."
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Kristallnacht (n.)
in reference to the pogrom of Nov. 9-10, 1938, in Germany and Austria; from German, literally "crystal night;" often translated as "Night of Broken Glass." See crystal (n.) + night (n.).
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noctidial (adj.)

"comprising a night and a day," 1690s, from Latin noct-, stem of nox "night" (see noct-) + dies "day" (see diurnal).

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foresight (n.)
also fore-sight, early 14c., "insight obtained beforehand;" also "prudence," from fore- + sight (n.). Perhaps modeled on Latin providentia. Compare German Vorsicht "attention, caution, cautiousness."
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