Etymology
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reportage (n.)

"the describing of events," 1877, from French; see report (v.) + -age.

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capsulize (v.)

of news, etc., "summarize in compact form," 1950, from capsule + -ize. Related: Capsulized; capsulizing.

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newsworthy (adj.)

"of interest to the general public," 1932, from news (n.) + worthy (adj.). Related: Newsworthiness.

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lowball (v.)

also low-ball, "report or estimate lower," from low (adj.) + ball (n.1).

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Evangeline 

fem. proper name, from French Évangeline, ultimately from Greek evangelion "good news" (see evangelism).

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posted (adj.)

"supplied with news or full information," 1828, American English, past-participle adjective from post (v.2).

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rumor (v.)

1590s, transitive, "spread a rumor; tell by way of report," from rumor (n.). Related: Rumored; rumoring.

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censor (v.)

1833, "to act as a censor (of news or public media);" from censor (n.). Related: Censored; censoring.

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defame (v.)
Origin and meaning of defame

"speak evil of, maliciously speak or write what injures the reputation of," c. 1300, from Old French defamer (13c., Modern French diffamer), from Medieval Latin defamare, from Latin diffamare "to spread abroad by ill report, make a scandal of," from dis-, here probably suggestive of ruination, + fama "a report, rumor" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Related: Defamed; defaming.

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defamatory (adj.)
Origin and meaning of defamatory

"containing defamation, caluminous, injurious to reputation," 1590s, from French diffamatoire, Medieval Latin diffamatorius "tending to defame," from diffamat-, past-participle stem of diffamare"to spread abroad by ill report, make a scandal of," from dis-, here probably suggestive of ruination, + fama "a report, rumor" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Earlier in the same sense was defamative (c. 1500).

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