Etymology
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incase (v.)

variant of encase.

Theory of Incasement, an old theory of reproduction which assumed that when the first animal of each species was created, the germs of all other individuals of the same species which were to come from it were incased in its ova. The discovery of spermatozoa developed the theory in two opposite directions: the ovulists, or ovists, held still to the theory of incasement in the female while the animalculists, or spermists, entertained the theory of incasement in the male. [Century Dictionary]
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quilt (v.)

1550s, "to stuff or interline in the manner of a quilt; to stitch together in the manner of a quilt," from quilt (n.). Related: Quilted; quilting. Quilting bee, "a social gathering of women for the purpose of assisting one of their number in quilting a counterpane," usually followed by a supper or other entertainment, is attested from 1824, originally a New England custom (see bee).

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agitate (v.)

1580s, "to disturb," from Latin agitatus, past participle of agitare "to put in constant or violent motion, drive onward, impel," frequentative of agere "to set in motion, drive, drive forward," figuratively "incite to action; keep in movement, stir up" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").

The sense of "move to and fro, shake" is from 1590s. The meaning "to discuss, debate" is from 1640s, that of "keep (a political or social question) constantly in public view" is by 1828. Related: Agitated; agitating.

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socialite (n.)

1928, first in "Time" magazine, from social (adj.) in the "pertaining to high society" sense, perhaps as a play on social light, in imitation of words in -ite (1).

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Arizona 

1861, originally as the name of a breakaway Confederate region of southern New Mexico; later applied to a U.S. territory organized in 1863 roughly along the lines of the modern state and admitted in 1912. From Spanish Arizonac, which is probably from a local name among the O'odham (Piman) people meaning "having a little spring." An alternative theory is that it derives from Basque arizonak "good oaks."

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goo-goo (adj.)

"amorous," 1900, perhaps connected with goggle, because the earliest reference is in goo-goo eyes. Use in reference to politics is from 1890s and seems to be a shortening of Good Government as the name of a movement to clean up municipal corruption in Boston, New York, etc. It soon was extended to mean "naive political reformer." Goo-goo as imitative of baby-talk is from 1863.

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classless (adj.)

1874 in the social sense, "having or belonging to no class," from class (n.) in the "social order" sense + -less. As "lacking the sophistication of high class," by 1979. Related: Classlessly; classlessness.

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socialize (v.)

1828, "to render social," from social (adj.). Meaning "to be sociable, to mingle" is recorded from 1895. Meaning "to make socialistic" is from 1846. Related: Socialized; socializing. The phrasing in socialized medicine is by 1912.

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zouk (n.)

Creole French, "party," from zouker "engage in unrestrained social activity."

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phoresis (n.)

"the movement of small particles by some agency," 1897, from Greek phorēsis "a being carried," from pherein "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). 

In a paper which I sent to the Dental Section of the International Medical Congress, to be held at Moscow in August, I made a proposition to substitute [for cataphoresis] the word "phoresis," and we will speak of the phoretic action instead of the cataphoretic or anaphoretic. [Dr. W.J. Morton of New York in "Items of Interest," vol. XIX, 1897]
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