Etymology
Advertisement
dogged (adj.)

"having the qualities of a dog" (mostly in a negative sense, "mean, surly, contemptible"), c. 1300, from dog (n.). Meaning "persistent, silently obstinate" is from 1779. Hence doggedly (late 14c.), "cruelly, maliciously;" later "with a dog's persistence" (1773). Related: Doggedness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
negation (n.)

early 15c., negacioun, "an act of denial," from Old French negacion (12c.) and directly from Latin negationem (nominative negatio) "denial," noun of action from past-participle stem of negare "deny, say no," from PIE root *ne- "not." As "a negative assertion," mid-15c.

Related entries & more 
peep (n.2)

"a short chirp, the cry of a mouse or young chick or other small bird," mid-15c., from peep (v.2); meaning "slightest sound or utterance" (usually in a negative context) is attested by 1903. Meaning "young chicken" is from 1680s. The marshmallow peeps confection are said to date from the 1950s.

Related entries & more 
nefandous (adj.)

"not to be spoken of, abominable, very shocking to the general sense of justice or religion," 1630s, from Latin nefandus "unmentionable, impious, heinous," from ne-, negative particle (see un- (1)), + fandus "to be spoken," gerundive of fari "to speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

Related entries & more 
meritocracy (n.)

coined 1958 by British sociologist Michael Young (1915-2002) and used in title of his book, "The Rise of the Meritocracy"; from merit (n.) + -cracy. Related: Meritocratic.

[Young's book] imagined an elite that got its position not from ancestry, but from test scores and effort. For him, meritocracy was a negative term; his spoof was a warning about the negative consequences of assigning social status based on formal educational qualifications, and showed how excluding from leadership anyone who couldn't jump through the educational hoops would create a new form of discrimination. And that's exactly what has happened. [Lani Guinier, interview, New York Times, Feb. 7, 2015]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
abnegation (n.)
Origin and meaning of abnegation

late 14c., "a negative assertion," c. 1500 as "self-denial, renunciation," from Latin abnegationem (nominative abnegatio) "refusal, denial," noun of action from past-participle stem of abnegare "to refuse, deny," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + negare "to deny," from PIE root *ne- "not."

Related entries & more 
negatory (adj.)

"expressing denial or negation," 1570s, from French negatoire or directly from Medieval Latin negatorius "negative," from Latin negatus, past participle of negare "deny, say no, to refuse" (from PIE root *ne- "not"). In the sense "no" it is U.S. Air Force slang from the early 1950s.

Related entries & more 
unkempt (adj.)

1570s, from un- (1) "not" + kempt "well-combed, neat," from variant past participle of Middle English kemben "to comb," from Old English cemban "to comb," from Proto-Germanic *kambijan, from *kamb- "comb" (from PIE root *gembh- "tooth, nail." ). Form unkembed is recorded from late 14c. The verb kemb is rare after 1400s, but its negative past participle form endures.

Related entries & more 
assurance (n.)
late 14c., "formal or solemn pledge, promise," also "certainty, full confidence," from Old French asseurance "assurance, promise; truce; certainty, safety, security" (11c., Modern French assurance), from asseurer "to reassure, to render sure" (see assure). Meaning "self-confident" is from 1590s. The word had a negative tinge 18c., often suggesting impudence or presumption.
Related entries & more 
nother (pron.)

word formed from misdivision of another as a nother (see N for other examples), c. 1300. From 14c.-16c. no nother is sometimes encountered as a misdivision of none other or perhaps as an emphatic negative; Old English had noðer as a contraction of ne oðer "no other." Hence Middle English nother-gates (adv.) "not otherwise" (c. 1300).

Related entries & more 

Page 4