Etymology
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maraca (n.)

gourd rattle used as a Latin-American percussion instrument, 1813, from Portuguese, from a Brazilian native name. Related: Maracas.

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coca (n.)

South American plant, 1570s, from Spanish coca, from Quechua (Inca) cuca, which is perhaps ultimately from the related Aymara, a native language of Bolivia.

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sasquatch (n.)

one of a race of huge, hairy man-monsters supposed to inhabit the Pacific northwest woods in Native American lore and also known as bigfoot, 1929, from Halkomelem (Salishan), a native language of the Pacific Northwest, sæsq'ec [Bright].

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redskin (n.)

"North American Indian," 1690s, from red (adj.1) + skin (n.). "(Not the preferred term.)" [OED]. Red as the skin color of Native Americans is from 1580s; red man "North American Indian" is from 1580s.

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tarpon (n.)

large fish (Megalops atlanticus) of the herring family, 1680s, of uncertain origin, probably from a Native American word. Also formerly called jew-fish.

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hunting (n.)

modification of Old English huntung "a hunt, chase; what is hunted, game," verbal noun from hunt (v.). Bartlett (1848) notes it as the word commonly used by sportsmen in the Southern states of the U.S. where in the North they use gunning. Happy hunting-grounds "Native American afterlife paradise" is from "Last of the Mohicans" (1826); hunting-ground in a Native American context is from 1777.

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Chickasaw 

native American people formerly of Mississippi and Alabama, 1670s, from Chickasaw Chikasha, the people's name for themselves. Also their (Muskogean) language.

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scuppernong (n.)

cultivated muscadine grape vine, 1811, from the name of the river in North Carolina, which is recorded 18c. as Cascoponung, Cuscopang, from an unidentified Native American word.

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sagamore (n.)

"king or chief among some Native American tribes," 1610s, sagamo, from Abenaki (Algonquian) zogemo "chief, ruler," which is distantly related to the source of sachem.

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Tecumseh 

Native American leader (1768-1813), his name is Shawnee (Algonquian), perhaps literally "flies across;" compare Menominee /takhamehse:w/ "flies straight across."

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