Etymology
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show-bill (n.)

also showbill, "placard or advertisement announcing a performance, goods for sale, etc.," by 1801; see show (n.) + bill (n.1).

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prestidigitation (n.)

"sleight of hand; the performance of feats requiring dexterity and skill, particularly of the fingers," 1843, from French prestidigitation, which was coined along with prestidigitator (q.v.).

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bluesy (adj.)
1946 in the musical sense, from blues (n.1) + -y (2).
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bugle (n.1)
"brass musical instrument," mid-14c., abbreviation of buglehorn "musical horn, hunting horn" (c. 1300), from Old French bugle "(musical) horn," also "wild ox, buffalo," from Latin buculus "heifer, young ox," diminutive of bos "ox, cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow"). Middle English also had the word in the "buffalo" sense and it survived in dialect with meaning "young bull." Modern French bugle is a 19c. borrowing from English.
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clownery (n.)

1580s, "condition or character of a clown; ill-breeding, rudeness of manners," from clown (n.) + -ery. From 1823 as "performance of a comic clown."

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la (1)
musical note (sixth note of the diatonic scale), early 14c., see gamut. It represents the initial syllable of Latin labii "of the lips." In French and Italian it became the name of the musical note A, which is the sixth of the natural scale (C major).
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mummery (n.)

1520s, "a show or performance of mumming," from Old French mommerie, from momer "to mask oneself" (see mummer). Transferred sense of "ridiculous ceremony or ritual" is from 1540s.

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Mellotron (n.)
type of electronic musical instrument, 1963, from mello(w) + (elec)tron(ic).
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concertina (n.)

"portable, accordion-like musical instrument," 1835, from concert + fem. ending -ina. Invented 1829 by English inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (who also invented the stereoscope and the Wheatstone bridge). Concertina wire attested by 1917, so called from similarity to the musical instrument.

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musicianship (n.)

"skill in musical composition or expression," 1828, from musician + -ship.

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