Etymology
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musicianship (n.)

"skill in musical composition or expression," 1828, from musician + -ship.

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sext (n.)

early 15c., "third of the lesser canonical hours" in churches and religious houses, from Latin sexta (hora), fem. of sextus, ordinal of sex (see six). The office of the sixth hour, originally and properly said at midday. Also "the interval of a sixth in music," etc.

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Mellotron (n.)

type of electronic musical instrument, 1963, from mello(w) + (elec)tron(ic).

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concertina (n.)

"portable, accordion-like musical instrument," 1835, from concert + fem. ending -ina. Invented 1829 by English inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (who also invented the stereoscope and the Wheatstone bridge). Concertina wire attested by 1917, so called from similarity to the musical instrument.

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cadence (v.)

"to regulate by musical measure," 1749, from cadence (n.). Related: Cadenced; cadencing.

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quartet (n.)

also quartette, 1773, "musical composition for four solo instruments or voices," from French quartette, from Italian quartetto, diminutive of quarto "fourth," from Latin quartus "the fourth, fourth part" (related to quattuor "four," from PIE root *kwetwer- "four"). Meaning "set of four singers or musical players who perform quartets" is from 1814.

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musico- 

word-forming element meaning "music, musical, music and," from combining form of Latin musicus (see music).

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atonal (adj.)

in musical composition, "not considering scale or tone," 1911, from a- (3) "not, without" + tonal.

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cithara (n.)

ancient stringed musical instrument, 1789, from Latinized form of Greek kithara (see guitar). Related: Citharist.

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fantasia (n.)

"musical composition that sounds extemporaneous," 1724, from Italian fantasia, from Latin phantasia (see fantasy).

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