Etymology
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multiform (adj.)

also multi-form, "having many forms," c. 1600, from French multiforme or Latin multiformis "many-shaped, manifold," from multus "much, many" (see multi-) + forma "shape" (see form (n.)).

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multilingual (adj.)

also multi-lingual, "speaking, written in, or characterized by many languages," 1832, from multi- "many" + Latin lingua "language," literally "tongue" (from PIE root *dnghu- "tongue"). Related: Multilingually; multilingualism.

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segregationist (n.)

"adherent or advocate of racial segregation," 1915, from segregation + -ist

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multinominous (adj.)

"having many names or terms," 1610s, from Late Latin multinominis "many-named," from multi- "many" (see multi-) + Latin nomen (genitive nominis) "name," cognate with Old English nama (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). 

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supremacist (n.)
by 1948, originally with reference to racial beliefs and in most cases with white, from supremacy + -ist. Compare supremist. Related: Supremacism.
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desegregate (v.)

"abolish racial segregation" (in schools, etc.), 1948, back-formation from desegregation. Related: Desegregated; desegregating.

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multicultural (adj.)

also multi-cultural, of a society, "consisting of varied cultural groups," by 1941; see multi- "many"+ culture (n.) + -al (1). At first often in a Canadian context. Picked up by U.S. education writers 1980s; widespread popular use from c. 1990.

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multiflora (n.)

1829, in reference to a type of rose bearing several flowers on one stem, from Latin multiflora (rosa), from fem. of multiflorus, "abounding in flowers," from multi- "many" (see multi-) + flor-, stem of flos "flower" (see florid). Multiflorous "many-flowered" is attested by 1760, from Latin multiflorus.

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Caucasoid (adj.)

"Caucasian-like," used in old racial writings of the Ainu, etc., 1909; see Caucasian (adj.) + -oid.

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multinational (adj.)

also multi-national, by 1921, "comprising or pertaining to many nations," from multi- + national. Originally with reference to states; later (by 1960) to corporations and organizations. As a noun, short for multinational corporation (itself attested by 1956), one having branches, offices, etc. in many countries, it is attested by 1971.

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