Etymology
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fistful (n.)
"as much as a fist will hold," 1610s, from fist (n.) + -ful.
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cloying (adj.)

"satiating, wearying by too much," 1640s, present-participle adjective from cloy (v.). Related: Cloyingly; cloyingness.

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bloodshed (n.)
also blood-shed, c. 1500, "the shedding of (one's) blood," from verbal phrase (attested in late Old English) -- e.g. "there was much blood shed" -- from blood (n.) + past participle of shed (v.). The sense of "slaughter" is much older (early 13c., implied in bloodshedding).
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bagful (n.)
"as much as a bag will hold," c. 1300, bagge-ful, from bag (n.) + -ful.
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glassful (n.)
Old English glæsful "as much as a glass will hold;" see glass (n.) + -ful.
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snootful (n.)
"as much (liquor) as one can take," 1885, from snoot (n.) + -ful.
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doubloon (n.)

gold coin of Spain and Spanish America, 1620s, from French doublon (16c.) and directly from Spanish doblon a gold coin, augmentative of doble "double" (coin so called because originally it was worth twice as much as the Spanish gold pistole), from Latin duplus "twofold, twice as much" (see double (adj.)). Also see -oon.

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*pele- (1)
*pelə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to fill," with derivatives referring to abundance and multitude.

It forms all or part of: accomplish; complete; compliment; comply; depletion; expletive; fele; fill; folk; full (adj.); gefilte fish; hoi polloi; implement; manipulation; nonplus; plebe; plebeian; plebiscite; pleiotropy; Pleistocene; plenary; plenitude; plenty; plenum; plenipotentiary; pleo-; pleonasm; plethora; Pliocene; pluperfect; plural; pluri-; plus; Pollux; poly-; polyamorous; polyandrous; polyclinic; polydactyl; polydipsia; Polydorus; polyethylene; polyglot; polygon; polygraph; polygyny; polyhedron; polyhistor; polymath; polymer; polymorphous; Polynesia; polyp; Polyphemus; polyphony; polysemy; polysyllabic; polytheism; replenish; replete; supply; surplus; volkslied.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit purvi "much," prayah "mostly;" Avestan perena-, Old Persian paru "much;" Greek polys "much, many," plethos "people, multitude, great number," ploutos "wealth;" Latin plus "more," plenus "full;" Lithuanian pilus "full, abundant;" Old Church Slavonic plunu; Gothic filu "much," Old Norse fjöl-, Old English fela, feola "much, many;" Old English folgian; Old Irish lan, Welsh llawn "full;" Old Irish il, Welsh elu "much."
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celebrated (adj.)

"much-talked-about, having celebrity, famous," 1660s, past-participle adjective from celebrate (v.).

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overuse (n.)

also over-use, "too much or too frequent use," 1824, from over- + use (n.).

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