Etymology
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driving-wheel (n.)

in mechanics, "main wheel that communicates motion to others," 1838, from drive (v.) + wheel (n.).

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screenplay (n.)

"script from which a motion picture is made," 1916, from screen (n.) in the cinematic sense + play (n.).

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contrail (n.)

"white line of ice crystals behind an airplane in motion," 1945, from condensation trail (1942); see condensation.

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shiver (n.2)
"a tremulous, quivering motion," 1727, from shiver (v.1). The shivers in reference to fever chills is from 1861.
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hydraulics (n.)
"branch of engineering which treats of the conveyance and motion of water," 1670s, from hydraulic; also see -ics.
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cam (n.1)

1777, "a projecting part of a rotating machinery used to impart motion to another part," from Dutch cam "cog of a wheel," originally "comb," from Proto-Germanic *kambaz "comb," from PIE root *gembh- "tooth, nail." It is thus a cognate of English comb (n.). This might have combined with English camber "having a slight arch;" or the whole thing could be from camber. It converts regular rotary motion into irregular, fast-and-slow rotary or reciprocal motion. "The original method was by cogs or teeth fixed or cut at certain points in the circumference or disc of a wheel ..." [OED]. Cam-shaft attested from 1850.

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primum mobile (n.)

"the first source of motion," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin (11c.), literally "the first movable thing;" see prime (adj.) + mobile.

In the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, the tenth or outermost of the revolving spheres of the universe, which was supposed to revolve from east to west in twenty-four hours, and to carry the others along with it in its motion; hence, any great or first source of motion. [Century Dictionary]

A translation of Arabic al-muharrik al-awwal "the first moving" (Avicenna). Englished by Chaucer as the firste Moeuyng (c. 1400). Old science also had primum frigidum "pure cold: an elementary substance, according to the doctrine of Parmenides."


 

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kinase (n.)

1902, from Greek kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + chemical suffix -ase.

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volvox (n.)
genus of fresh-water algae, 1798, from Latin volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." So called from their motion.
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hydrodynamic (adj.)
"derived from the force or motion of fluid," 1815, from hydro- + dynamic (adj.). Related: Hydrodynamics (1764), from Modern Latin hydrodynamica (Huberti, 1758).
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