Etymology
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Antaeus 
Libyan giant slain by Herakles, from Latinized form of Greek Antaios, literally "opposite, opposed to, hostile," from anta "over against, face to face," related to anti "opposite, against" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before").
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frontier (n.)

c. 1400, frowntere, "front line of an army;" early 15c., fronture, "borderland, part of a country which faces another," from Old French frontiere "boundary-line of a country," also "frontier fortress; front rank of an army" (13c.), noun use of adjective frontier "facing, neighboring," from front "brow" (see front (n.)). In reference to North America, "part of the country which is at the edge of its settled regions" from 1670s. Later it was given a specific sense:

What is the frontier? ... In the census reports it is treated as the margin of that settlement which has a density of two or more to the square mile. [F.J. Turner, "The Frontier in American History," 1920]
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storefront (n.)
1853, from store (n.) + front (n.). As an adjective from 1919.
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ante meridiem 
"of morning, before mid-day," 1560s, Latin, literally "before noon," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + accusative of meridies "midday, noon" (see meridian). Adjective antemeridian is attested from 1650s.
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ante (n.)
in the game of poker, "stake of money placed in a pool by each player before drawing cards," 1838, American English poker slang, apparently from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). From 1846 as a verb.
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prostate (n.)

"the prostate gland," 1640s, from French prostate, from Medieval Latin prostata "the prostate," from Greek prostatēs (adēn) "prostate (gland)," from prostatēs "leader, ruler, guardian; one standing in front," from proistanai "set before," from pro "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + histanai "cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." So called from its position at the base of the bladder and immediately in front of its mouth. Related: Prostatic.

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van (n.1)
"front part of an army or other advancing group," c. 1600, shortening of vanguard.
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facing (n.)
"defiance," 1520s, verbal noun from face (v.). Meaning "action of turning the face toward" is from 1540s; that of "covering in front of a garment" is from 1560s; that of "a coating" is from 1580s; that of "front or outer part of a wall, building, etc.," is from 1823. Earliest use is as "disfiguring, defacing" (c. 1400).
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antepenultimate (adj.)

"the last but two," 1730, from antepenult (n.), 1610s, abbreviation of Latin antepænultima (syllaba) "last syllable but two in a word," from fem. of antepænultimus, from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + pænultima, from pæne "almost" (a word of uncertain origin) + ultima "last" (see ultimate).

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neckline (n.)

also neck-line, "shape of the top of a woman's garment at the front," 1900, from neck (n.) + line (n.).

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