Etymology
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moose (n.)

"large quadruped mammal of northern North America noted for its enormous horns," 1610s, from an Algonquian language, probably Narragansett moos or Abenaki moz (compare Penobscot muns, Ojibwa mooz, Unami Delaware /mo:s/), said by early sources to be from moosu "he strips off," supposedly in reference to the animal's stripping bark for food in winter. The plural also is moose. The Loyal Order of Moose fraternal and service organization was founded in 1888.

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moot (n.)

early 12c., from Old English gemot "meeting, formal assembly" (especially of freemen, to discuss community affairs or mete justice), "society, assembly, council," from Proto-Germanic *ga-motan (compare Old Low Frankish muot "encounter," Middle Dutch moet, Middle High German muoz), from collective prefix *ga- + *motan (see meet (v.)). In early 15c. awful moot was used for "the Last Judgment."

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Moorish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Moors," mid-15c., moreis, morys, morreys, from Moor + -ish. Earlier was Moreske (mid-14c.), from Old French moresque, morisque. Also compare Morisco, Moresco.

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moocher (n.)

"beggar, scrounger," 1857, moucher, agent noun from mooch (v.).

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moony (adj.)

1580s, "like the moon;" 1848, "dreamy, listless, bewildered," from moon (n.) + -y (2). Also see moon (v.).

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Moog (n.)

electronic musical instrument, 1969, from Robert A. Moog (1934-2005), the U.S. engineer who invented it.

The point is that I don't design stuff for myself. I'm a toolmaker. I design things that other people want to use. [Robert Moog, interview in "Salon," 2000]
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Moonie (n.)

1974, nickname for a member of the Unification Church, headed by Sun Myung Moon.

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moonshine (n.)

early 15c., "moonlight, the shining of the moon," from moon (n.) + shine (n.). Similar formation in Dutch maneschijn, German Mondschein, Swedish månsken, Danish maaneskin. In a figurative use, "appearance without substance, pretense, fiction" from late 15c.; perhaps from the notion of "moonshine in water" (see moonraker) or "light without heat."

Meaning "illicit or smuggled liquor" is attested from 1785 (earliest reference is to that smuggled on the coasts of Kent and Sussex; in reference to Southern U.S., by 1829), from the notion of being brought in or taken out under cover of darkness at night. Moonlight also occasionally was used in this sense early 19c. As a verb in this sense from 1883. Related: Moonshiner "smuggler; one who pursues a dangerous or illegal trade at night" (1860).

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moor (n.)

"tract of open, untilled, more or less elevated ground, often overrun with heath," c. 1200, from Old English mor "morass, swamp," from Proto-Germanic *mora- (source also of Old Saxon, Middle Dutch, Dutch meer "swamp," Old High German muor "swamp," also "sea," German Moor "moor," Old Norse mörr "moorland," marr "sea"), perhaps related to mere (n.1), or from root *mer- "to die," hence "dead land."

The basic sense in place names is 'marsh', a kind of low-lying wetland possibly regarded as less fertile than mersc 'marsh.' The development of the senses 'dry heathland, barren upland' is not fully accounted for but may be due to the idea of infertility. [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names]

Hence moor-fowl "grouse" (c. 1500); moor-hen (mid-14c.); moor-cock (c. 1200 as a surname).

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Moor (n.)

"North African, Berber, one of the race dwelling in Barbary," late 14c., from Old French More, from Medieval Latin Morus, from Latin Maurus "inhabitant of Mauretania" (Roman northwest Africa, a region now corresponding to northern Algeria and Morocco), from Greek Mauros, perhaps a native name, or else cognate with mauros "black" (but this adjective only appears in late Greek and may as well be from the people's name as the reverse).

Also applied to the Arabic conquerors of Spain. Being a dark people in relation to Europeans, their name in the Middle Ages was a synonym for "Negro;" later (16c.-17c.); being the nearest Muslims to Western Europe, it was used indiscriminately of Muslims (Persians, Arabs, etc.) but especially those in India. Cognate with Dutch Moor, German Mohr, Danish Maurer, Spanish Moro, Italian Moro. Related: Mooress.

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