Etymology
Advertisement
ordinate (v.)

1560s, "ordain, appoint authoritatively" (a sense now obsolete); 1590s, "direct, dispose," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinated; ordinating.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
litany (n.)

c. 1200, "solemn prayer of supplication," from Old French letanie (13c., Modern French litanie) and directly from Medieval Latin letania, Late Latin litania (source also of Spanish letania, Italian litania), from Greek litaneia "prayer, an entreating," from lite "prayer, supplication, entreaty," a word of unknown origin. From the notion of monotonous enumeration of petitions in Christian prayer services came the generalized sense of "repeated series" (early 19c.), which originated in French.

For those who know the Greek words, a litany is a series of prayers, a liturgy is a canon of public service; the latter in practice includes prayer, but does not say so. [Fowler]

Related: Litaneutical.

Related entries & more 
operation (n.)

late 14c., "action, performance, work," also "the performance of some science or art," from Old French operacion "operation, working, proceedings," from Latin operationem (nominative operatio) "a working, operation," noun of action from past-participle stem of operari "to work, labor" (in Late Latin "to have effect, be active, cause"), from opera "work, effort," related to opus (genitive operis) "a work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance").

The surgical sense of "act or series of acts performed upon a patient's body," usually with instruments, is first attested 1590s. The military sense of "act of carrying out a preconcerted series of movements" is by 1749.

Related entries & more 
revue (n.)

1872, "a show presenting a review of current events," from French revue, literally "survey," noun use of fem. past participle of revoir "to see again" (see review (n.)). By 1890s it was extended to any elaborate musical show consisting of a series of unrelated scenes.

Related entries & more 
ordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "regular, normal," of behavior, thoughts, etc., "properly directed, proper," from Latin ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Ordinately.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
podcast 

"episodic series of spoken-word digital audio files that can be downloaded to a personal device and listened to at leisure," 2004, noun and verb, from pod-, from iPod, brand of portable media player, + second element abstracted from broadcast. Related: Podcasting.

Related entries & more 
coordinate (adj.)

1640s, "of the same order, belonging to the same rank or degree," from Medieval Latin coordinatus, past participle of coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "involving coordination" is from 1769. Related: Coordinance.

Related entries & more 
sutra (n.)
in Buddhism, "series of aphorisms" concerning ceremonies, rites, and conduct, 1801, from Sanskrit sutram "rule," literally "string, thread" (as a measure of straightness), from sivyati "sew," from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew." Applied also to rules of grammar, law, philosophy, etc., along with their commentaries.
Related entries & more 
colonnade (n.)

in architecture, "a series of columns placed at certain intervals," 1718, from French colonnade, from Italian colonnato, from colonna "column," from Latin columna "pillar," collateral form of columen "top, summit," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Also see -ade. Related: Colonnaded.

Related entries & more 
extrapolation (n.)

"an approximate calculation made by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data," 1867, noun of action from extrapolate by analogy of interpolation. The original sense was "an inserting of intermediate terms in a mathematical series." The transferred sense of "drawing of a conclusion about the future based on present tendencies" is from 1889.

Related entries & more 

Page 4