Etymology
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via (prep.)

1779, from Latin via "by way of," ablative form of via "way, road, path, highway, channel, course" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which is also the source of English way (n.)).

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crossway (n.)

also cross-way, c. 1300, "a crossroad," from cross- + way (n.). Crossways (adv.) "crosswise, transversely," with adverbial genitive -s, is from c. 1300.

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Shinto (n.)
native religious system of Japan, 1727, from Chinese shin tao "way of the gods," from shin "god, gods, spirit" + tao "way, path, doctrine." Related: Shintoism.
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pioneer (v.)

"to lead or prepare the way to or for, go before and open (a way)," 1780, from pioneer (n.). Related: Pioneered; pioneering.

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Taoism (n.)
religious system founded by Lao Tzu (b. 604 B.C.E.), 1838, from Chinese tao "way, path, right way (of life), reason" + -ism.
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sayonara 

"farewell, good-bye," 1875, from Japanese, said to mean literally "if it is to be that way," from sayo "that way," + nara "if."

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latex (n.)
1660s, "body fluid," from Latin latex (genitive laticis) "liquid, a liquid, fluid," probably from Greek latax "dregs," from PIE root *lat- "wet, moist" (source also of Middle Irish laith "beer," Welsh llaid "mud, mire," Lithuanian latakas "pool, puddle," Old Norse leþja "filth").

From 1835 as "milky liquid from plants." Meaning "water-dispersed polymer particles" (used in rubber goods, paints, etc.) is from 1937. As an adjective by 1954, in place of the classically correct laticiferous.
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