Etymology
Advertisement
conceited (adj.)

c. 1600, "having an overweening opinion of oneself" (short for self-conceited, 1590s), past-participle adjective from conceit (v.) "conceive, imagine, think" (1550s), a now-obsolete verb from conceit (n.). Earlier it meant "having intelligence, ingenious, witty" (1540s). Related: Conceitedly; conceitedness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
presidio (n.)

a seat of government, especially a place of military authority, hence, in U.S. Southwest, "a military post," 1808, American English, from Spanish presidio "fort, settlement," from Latin praesidium "defense, protection," from praesidere "to sit before, protect" (see preside). Related: Presidial; presidary.

Related entries & more 
awol (adj.)

also a.w.o.l., military initialism (acronym) for absent without leave (the phrase itself is attested by 1767 in a military context). In U.S. military use by 1917. According to the "Dictionary of Contemporary American Usage" (1957), it was pronounced as four letters in World War I, as a word in World War II.

Related entries & more 
foot-locker (n.)

1905, U.S. military, from foot (n.) + locker.

Related entries & more 
jackboot (n.)

also jack-boot, 1680s, type of large, strong over-the-knee cavalry boot of 17c.-18c., later a type worn by German military and para-military units in the Nazi period. From jack (n.), though the exact sense here is unclear + boot (n.1). Figurative of military oppression since 1768. Related: Jackbooted.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Caligula 

cognomen of the mad, extravagant, and legendarily cruel third Roman emperor (12 C.E.-41 C.E.), born Gaius Caesar. The nickname is Latin, literally "little boot," given when he joined his father on military campaigns when still a toddler, in full, child-sized military gear; it is a diminutive of caliga "heavy military shoe," which is of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
recce 

1941, World War II military slang, short for reconnaissance (n.). As a verb by 1943. The World War I military slang term for the noun was recco (1917). Also compare recon.

Related entries & more 
task-force (n.)

1941, originally military; see task (n.) + force (n.).

Related entries & more 
drill (v.2)

"to instruct in military exercise," 1620s (a sense also found in Dutch drillen and the Danish and German cognates), probably from drill (v.1) on the notion of troops "turning" in maneuvers. Related: Drilled, drilling.

As a noun, "act of training soldiers in military tactics," 1630s; the extended sense of "the agreed-upon procedure" is by 1940. Drill-sergeant "non-commissioned officer who instructs soldiers in their duties and trains them in military movements" is by 1760. Drill-master "one who gives practical instructions in military tactics" is by 1766.

Related entries & more 
warcraft (n.)

"military science," c. 1400, from war (n.) + craft (n.).

Related entries & more 

Page 4