Etymology
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medieval (adj.)
Origin and meaning of medieval

"pertaining to or suggestive of the Middle Ages," 1825 (mediaeval), coined in English from Latin medium "the middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle") + aevum "age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity").

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mediant (n.)

in music, "third note of the diatonic scale" (the one which determines whether the scale is major or minor), 1753, from Italian mediante, from Late Latin mediantem (nominative medians) "dividing in the middle," present participle of mediare "to be in the middle," from Latin medius "middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle"). So called from being midway between the tonic and the dominant.

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mean (adj.2)

"occupying a middle or intermediate place;" mid-14c., of persons, "of middle rank" (but this is possibly from, or mixed with, mean (adj.1)); from Anglo-French meines (plural), Old French meien, variant of moiien "mid-, medium, common, middle-class" (12c., Modern French moyen), from Late Latin medianus "of the middle," from Latin medius "in the middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle").

From late 14c. as "in a middle state, between two extremes." Meaning "intermediate in time, coming between two events or points in time" is from mid-15c. (the sense in meanwhile, meantime). The mathematical sense "intermediate in a number of greater or lesser values, quantities, or amounts" is from late 14c.

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mesocracy (n.)
"government by the middle classes," 1858, from meso- "middle" + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Mesocratic (1857).
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North Star (n.)
"Pole Star, Polaris," Middle English norþe sterre (late 14c.); cognate with Middle Dutch noirdstern, German Nordstern.
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mid (adj.)

"middle; being the middle part or midst; being between, intermediate," Old English mid, midd from Proto-Germanic *medja- (source also of Old Norse miðr, Old Saxon middi, Old Frisian midde, Middle Dutch mydde, Old High German mitti, German mitte, Gothic midjis "mid, middle"), from PIE root *medhyo- "middle."

By late Middle English probably felt as a prefix only, and now surviving in English only as a prefix (mid-air, midstream, etc.). Prefixed to months, seasons, etc. from late Old English. As a preposition, "in the middle of, amid" (c. 1400) it is from in midde or a shortened form of amid (compare midshipman) and sometimes is written 'mid.

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median (n.)

1540s, "a median part," originally anatomical, from Latin medianus "of the middle" (see median (adj.)). Statistical meaning "middle number of a series" is from 1883.

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mezzanine (n.)

1711, "a low story between two higher ones in a building," from French mezzanine (17c.), from Italian mezzanino, from mezzano "middle," from Latin medianus "of the middle," from medius (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle"). Sense of "lowest balcony in a theater" recorded by 1913.

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mesoderm (n.)

"middle germinal layer of the three-layered embryo of a metazoic animal," 1858, from French mésoderme or German Mesoderm, literally "middle skin," coined by German physician Robert Remak (1815-1865) from meso- "middle" + Greek derma "skin" (see -derm). Related: Mesodermal; mesodermic.

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unspoken (adj.)
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of speak (v.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ongesproken, Middle Low German ungesproken.
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