Etymology
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drang nach Osten (n.)

German imperialistic policy of eastward expansion, 1906, literally "pressure to the east." From drang "pressure."

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dal (n.)

sort of vetch cultivated in the East Indies, 1690s, from Hindi dal "split pulse," from Sanskrit dala, from dal "to split."

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clatter (v.)

"make a rattling sound," from Old English *clatrian (implied by late Old English verbal noun clatrung "clattering, noise"), of imitative origin. Compare Middle Dutch klateren, East Frisian klatern, Low German klattern "to clatter, rattle;" perhaps all are from PIE root *gal- "to call, shout." The noun is attested from mid-14c., from the verb. Related: Clattered; clattering.

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thole (n.)
"peg," from Old English þoll "oar-pin," from Proto-Germanic *thulnaz (source also of Old Norse þollr, Middle Low German dolle, East Frisian dolle, Dutch dol), of unknown origin; according to Watkins probably from Proto-Germanic *thul-, from PIE root *teue- "to swell," on the notion of "a swelling." No record of the word in English from c. 1000 to mid-15c.
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Tokyo 
so named 1868, from Japanese to "east" + kyo "capital;" its earlier name was Edo, literally "estuary."
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Grepo (n.)
East Berlin border guard during the Cold War, by 1964, from German, contraction of Grenzpolizei "border police."
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okra (n.)

vegetable cultivated in the East and West Indies and southern U.S., 1670s, from a West African language (compare Akan nkruma "okra").

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paltry (adj.)

"mean, worthless, despicable," 1560s, probably an adjectival use of noun paltry "worthless thing" (1550s), associated with dialectal palt, pelt "trash," cognate with Middle Low German and East Frisian palte "rag," Middle Dutch palt "broken or torn fragment." Similar formation in Low German paltrig "rubbishy," East Frisian palterig "ragged, torn."

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bluster (v.)
late 14c., "stray blindly or blunderingly, wander aimlessly, go astray;" c. 1400, of persons, "shout loudly and angrily," from a Low German source, such as Middle Low German blüstren "to blow violently," East Frisian blüstern "to bluster," probably from the same source as blow (v.1), or perhaps imitative. Of weather in English from mid-15c. Related: Blustered; blustering.
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swale (n.)
"low, hollow place, often boggy," 1580s, special use of Scottish swaill "low, hollow place," or East Anglian dialectal swale "shady place" (mid-15c.); both probably from Old Norse svalr "cool," from Proto-Germanic *swalaz. A local word in England, in U.S. given broad application, especially to the lower tracts of the prairie and recently to landscaping features in suburban developments.
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