Etymology
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alloy (v.)

c. 1400, "mix (a metal) with a baser metal," from Old French aloiier, aliier "assemble, join," from Latin alligare "bind to, tie to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ligare "to bind, bind one thing to another, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). In figurative use often implying debasement or reduction. Meaning "to mix any two metals" without reference to values is from 1822. Related: Alloyed; alloying.

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vane (n.)
"plate metal wind indicator," early 15c., southern England alteration (see V) of fane "flag, banner."
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cesium (n.)

also caesium, rare alkaline metal, 1861, coined by Bunsen and Kirchhoff in 1860 in Modern Latin (caesium), from Latin caesius "blue-gray" (especially of eyes), in reference to the two prominent blue lines in its spectrum, by which it was first identified. With metallic element ending -ium. The first metal discovered by the aid of a spectroscope.

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photogravure (n.)

"process of engraving a metal by photography," 1869, from photo- + gravure "engraving," from French, from graver (see grave (v.)) + -ure (see -ure).

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knuckle-duster (n.)
face-busting, hand-protecting metal knuckle-guard, 1857, from knuckle (n.) + duster, name of a type of protective coat worn by workmen.
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door-knocker (n.)

"metal device fixed to the outside of a door for banging to give notice when someone desires admission," 1794, from door + knocker (n.).

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mosh (v.)
"to dance (with a certain amount of violence) to metal music in a tightly packed arena," 1987, perhaps a variant of mash. Related: Mosh pit.
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electroplate (n.)

"articles coated with silver or other metal by the process of electroplating," 1844, from electro- + plate (n.). As a verb by 1870.

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torque (n.)
"rotating force," 1882, from Latin torquere "to twist, turn, turn about, twist awry, distort, torture," from PIE *torkw-eyo-, causative of root *terkw- "to twist." The word also is used (since 1834) by antiquarians and others as a term for the twisted metal necklace worn anciently by Gauls, Britons, Germans, etc., from Latin torques "collar of twisted metal," from torquere. Earlier it had been called in English torques (1690s). Torque-wrench is from 1941.
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plumb-line (n.)

"a cord or line with a metal bob attached to one end, used to determine vertical direction," mid-15c., from plumb (n.) + line (n.).

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