Etymology
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purgative (adj.)

late 14c., purgatif, in medicine, "having the property of cleansing by expelling impure matter from the body," from Old French purgatif (14c.) and directly from Late Latin purgativus, from purgat-, past-participle stem of Latin purgare "to cleanse, purify" (see purge (v.)). The noun is attested from early 15c., "a medicine that evacuates the intestines" (Old English medical texts have clænsungdrenc).

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synergistic (adj.)
1818 in theology; 1876 in medicine, from synergist + -ic. General sense of "cooperative" is from 1965. Related: Synergistical (1650s); synergistically.
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pharmaco- 

word-forming element meaning "drug, medicine," also "poison," from Latinized form of Greek pharmakon "drug, poison" (see pharmacy).

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Galen 
celebrated Greek physician of 2c.; his work still was a foundation of medicine in the Middle Ages and his name is used figuratively for doctors.
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humoral (adj.)

in old medicine, "pertaining to the humors of the body," early 15c., from Old French humoral (14c.), from Latin humor (see humor (n.)).

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repellent (n.)

also repellant, 1660s, "agent or medicine that reduces tumors," from repellent (adj.). As "substance that repels insects," 1908.

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untreatable (adj.)
late 14c., "unmanageable," from un- (1) "not" + treatable (see treat (v.)). In medicine, of diseases, conditions, etc., by 1865.
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evacuee (n.)
1934, from French évacué, from évacuer, from Latin evacuare "to empty" (see evacuate) + -ee. Evacuant (n.) was used from 1730s in medicine.
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nostrum (n.)

c. 1600, "a medicine made of secret ingredients by secret methods," but commonly "quack medicine," from Latin nostrum remedium "our remedy" (or some similar phrase), presumably indicating "prepared by the person offering it," from Latin nostrum, neuter of noster "our," from nos "we," from PIE *nes- (2); see us. In extended use, "a pet scheme for accomplishing something" (1749).

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overdose (v.)

1727, "to administer medicine in too large a dose" (transitive); from 1968 as "to take an overdose of drugs" (intransitive); see over- + dose (v.). Related: Overdosed; overdosing.

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