Etymology
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snudge (n.)
"a miser, a mean avaricious person," 1540s, "very common from c. 1550-1610" [OED].
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Irian 
Indonesian name for New Guinea, said to mean literally "cloud-covered."
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Muscat 
capital of Oman, from Arabic Masqat, said to mean "hidden" (it is isolated from the interior by hills).
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backstreet (n.)
mid-15c., from back (adj.), here perhaps with a sense "inferior, mean, obscure" + street.
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satori (n.)

in Zen Buddhism, "enlightenment," 1727, from Japanese, said to mean literally "spiritual awakening."

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Guam 
from Chamorro Guahan, said to mean literally "what we have."
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bushido (n.)
"feudal samurai warrior code," 1898, from Japanese, said to mean literally "military-knight way."
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Micmac 
Algonquian tribe of the Canadian Maritimes and Newfoundland, by 1776, from mi:kemaw, a native name said to mean literally "allies."
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snivelling (adj.)
"mean-spirited, weak," 1640s, present-participle adjective from snivel (v.). Related: Snivellingly.
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anarchistic (adj.)
"advocating the political philosophy of anarchism," 1845, from anarchist + -ic. Differentiated from anarchic, which tends to mean "chaotic, lawless." Related: Anarchistically.
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