Etymology
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play-pen (n.)

also playpen, "enclosure in which a young child may play," 1916, from play + pen (n.2).

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reclinable (adj.)

"that may be tilted or set in a reclining position," 1840; see recline (v.) + -able.

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saturable (adj.)

"that may be saturated, capable of being soaked full," 1560s; see saturate (v.) + -able.

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possible (n.)

"that which may take place or come into being," 1640s, from possible (adj.).

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quantifiable (adj.)

"that may be measured with regard to quantity," 1868, from quantify + -able. Related: Quantifiably.

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pricket (n.)

"sharp point upon which a candle may be stuck," early 15c., from prick + -et.

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absit omen (interj.)
Latin, literally "may this omen be absent." Added to an expression of something one does not wish to be true or come true, "may it not be ominous;" from third person singular present subjunctive of abesse "be away" (see absent (adj.)) + omen (see omen).
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Mothers' Day 
the spelling used in the U.S. congressional resolution first recognizing it, May 9, 1908.
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Walpurgis night 

1820, from German Walpurgisnacht, witches' revel, especially on the Brocken in the Harz Mountains, on May-day eve, literally "the night of (St.) Walpurgis," from Walburga, English abbess who migrated to Heidenheim, Germany, and died there c. 780; May 1 being the day of the removal of her bones from Heidenheim to Eichstädt.

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mutability (n.)

late 14c., "tendency to change, inconstancy," from Old French mutabilité, from Latin mutabilitas, from mutabilis "changeable" (see mutable).

It is the same!—For, be it joy or sorrow,
    The path of its departure still is free;
Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow;
    Nought may endure but Mutability. 
[Shelley, from "Mutability," 1816]
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