Etymology
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insubstantial (adj.)
c. 1600, from Medieval Latin insubstantialis "not substantial," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Related: Insubstantially.
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colorant (n.)

"pigment, coloring material," 1884, from French colorant; see color + -ant.

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outwash (n.)

"material carried from a glacier by meltwater," 1894, from out- + wash (v.).

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circumstances (n.)
"condition of life, material welfare" (usually with a qualifying adjective), 1704, from circumstance.
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packing (n.)

"any material used for filling an empty space," 1824, from pack (v.).

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bodiless (adj.)
late 14c., "not consisting of material substance, incorporeal," from body (n.) + -less.
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blacktop (n.)
road resurfacing material, 1931, American English, from black (adj.) + top (n.1).
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non sequitur (n.)

1530s, in logic, "an inference or conclusion that does not follow from the premise," a Latin phrase, "it does not follow," from non "not" + third person singular present indicative of sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

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connotate (v.)

"to signify secondarily," 1590s, from Medieval Latin connotatus, past participle of connotare "signify in addition to the main meaning," a term in logic (see connotation). It is now obsolete, replaced by connote.

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dematerialization (n.)

"act of divesting of material qualities," 1877, originally in spiritualism, noun of action from dematerialize.

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