Etymology
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purification (n.)

late 14c., purificacioun, "ritual purification, a cleansing of the soul from guilt or defilement," originally especially in reference to the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary, from Old French purificacion, from Latin purificationem (nominative purificatio) "a purifying," noun of action from past-participle stem of purificare "to make pure" (see purify). General sense of "a freeing from dirt or defilement" is from 1590s.

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Sally 

fem. proper name, an alteration of Sarah (compare Hal from Harry, Moll from Mary, etc.). Sally Lunn cakes (by 1780), sweet and spongy, supposedly were named for the young woman in Bath who first made them and sold them in the streets. Sally Ann as a nickname for Salvation Army is recorded from 1927.

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ante-bellum (adj.)
also antebellum, from Latin phrase ante bellum, literally "before the war;" see ante- + bellicose. In U.S., usually in reference to the American Civil War (1861-65); attested in that specific sense by 1862 (it appears in a June 14 entry in Mary Chesnut's diary).
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marijuana (n.)

a preparation of Cannabis sativa for use as an intoxicant, generally by smoking, 1918, altered by influence of Spanish proper name Maria Juana "Mary Jane" from mariguan (1894), from Mexican Spanish marihuana, which is of uncertain origin. As the plant was not native to Mexico, a native source for the word seems unlikely.

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magdalen (n.)

"reformed prostitute," 1690s, in reference to "Mary called Magdalene out of whom went seven devils," disciple of Christ (Luke viii.2), who often is identified (especially since 5c. and especially in the Western Church) with the unnamed penitent "woman in the city, which was a sinner" in Luke vii.37-50. See Magdalene.

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Magdalene 

fem. proper name, from Latin (Maria) Magdalena, "Mary of Magdala," the companion and supporter of Jesus, from Greek Magdalene, literally "woman of Magdala," from Aramaic (Semitic) Maghdela, place on the Sea of Galilee, literally "tower" (compare Hebrew migdal "tower," from gadal "be great or high"). The vernacular form of the name, via French, has come to English as maudlin.

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ladybug (n.)
also lady-bug, 1690s, from lady + bug (n.). The "lady" is the Virgin Mary (compare German cognate Marienkäfer). In Britain, usually ladybird or lady-bird (1670s), supposedly through aversion to the word bug due to overtones of sodomy, however this seems to be the older form of the word. Also known 17c.-18c. as lady-cow or lady-fly.
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sellout (n.)

also sell-out, "corrupt bargain," 1862 (in Mary Chesnut's diary), from the verbal phrase (which from 1796 meant "dispose entirely of one's interests" in a company, etc.); see sell (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "event for which all tickets have been sold" is attested from 1923. The verbal phrase sell out in the sense of "prostitute one's ideals or talents" is attested from 1888 (selling out).

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Joseph 
masc. proper name, biblical son of Jacob and Rachel, and in the New Testament the name of the husband of Mary, mother of Jesus; from Late Latin Joseph, Josephus, from Greek Ioseph, from Hebrew Yoseph (also Yehoseph; see Psalms lxxxi.6) "adds, increases," causative of yasaph "he added." Its use in names of clothing and plants often is in reference to his "coat of many colors" (Genesis xxxvii.3).
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annunciation (n.)

early 14c., "Lady-day, Church festival commemorating announcement of the incarnation of Christ," from Anglo-French anunciacioun, Old French anonciacion "announcement, news; Feast of the Annunciation," from Latin annuntiationem (nominative annuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of annuntiare "announce, relate" (see announce).

General sense of "an announcing" is from 1560s. The Church festival (March 25) commemorates the visit of the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, foretelling the incarnation. Old English for "Annunciation Day" was bodungdæg.

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