Etymology
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buyer (n.)
c. 1200, biggere "one who purchases," agent noun from buy (v.). Meaning "one whose job is to buy goods for a store" is from 1884. Buyer's market attested from 1886.
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stallage (n.)
"tax levied for the privilege of erecting a stall at a market or fair," late 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from stall (n.1) + -age.
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ichthyo- 
word-forming element meaning "fish," from Latinized form of Greek ikhthys "a fish" (in plural, "a fish-market"), from PIE root *dhghu- "fish" (source also of Armenian jukn, Lithuanian žuvis).
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glut (n.)
1530s, "a gulp, a swallowing," from glut (v.). Meaning "condition of being full or sated" is 1570s; mercantile sense "superabundance, oversupply of a commodity on the market" first recorded 1590s.
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Dushanbe 
capital of Tajikistan, from Tajik dushanbe "Monday" (a compound of du "two" + Shanbe "Saturday," literally "Sabbath;" thus "two days after Saturday"); so called in reference to a regular Monday market there. Known from 1929-1961 as Stalinabad.
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saleable (adj.)

also, but less commonly, salable, "purchasable; capable of being sold, finding a ready market," 1520s, from sale + -able. Related: Salability; saleability (1797) which seems to have appeared first in Coleridge.

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ticker (n.)
1821, "something that ticks," agent noun from tick (v.); slang meaning "heart" first recorded 1930. Ticker tape (1891) is from ticker "telegraphic device for recording stock market quotations, etc." (1883).
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Rouen 

city in northern France, Roman Rotomagus, in which the second element is Gaulish magos "field, market." The first is roto "wheel," perhaps reflecting the Gaulish love of chariot-racing, or else it is a personal name.

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butcher (v.)
1560s, "to kill or slaughter for food or market," from butcher (n.). Figuratively, "to bungle, botch, spoil by bad work," 1640s. Related: Butchered; butchering. Re-nouned 1640s as butcherer.
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hoi polloi (n.)
1837, from Greek hoi polloi (plural) "the people," literally "the many" (plural of polys, from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Used in Greek by Dryden (1668) and Byron (1822), in both cases preceded by the, even though Greek hoi means "the," a mistake repeated often by subsequent writers who at least have the excuse of ignorance of Greek. Ho "the" is from PIE *so- "this, that" (nominative), cognate with English the and Latin sic. From the adjective agoraios "pertaining to the agora; frequenting the market" Greek had hoi agoraioi "loungers in the market, loafers, common, low men."
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