Etymology
Advertisement
agrimony (n.)

plant of the rosaceous genus Agrimonia, from Old English agrimonia from Latin agrimonia. Prior says it is "probably" from Greek argemōnē, "but what this plant was, or why it was called so, is unknown."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
phyto- 

word-forming element meaning "plant," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

Related entries & more 
forb (n.)

"broad-leaved herbaceous plant," 1924, from Greek phorbe "fodder, forage."

Related entries & more 
Plantagenet 

house or family which reigned in England from 1154 to 1485, the name apparently is literally "broom-plant" (French plante genêt), from Latin genista "broom plant."

Related entries & more 
simonize (v.)

"polish by the application of Simoniz," 1921, from Simoniz, trademark for a type of car polish invented by George Simons, who in 1910 along with Elmer Rich of the Great Northern Railway organized Simons Manufacturing Company in Chicago to sell the stuff. Rich and his brother, R.J. Rich, acquired sole ownership two years later.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
arnica (n.)

plant genus of the borage family, native to central Europe, 1753, Modern Latin, a name of unknown origin. Klein suggests Arabic arnabiyah, a name of a type of plant, as the ultimate source. Century Dictionary suggests "perhaps a perversion of ptarmica."

Related entries & more 
alkanet (n.)

mid-14c., "the plant alkanet" or its root (which yields a red dye material and is used as a styptic), from Medieval Latin, from a diminutive of alcanna, from Arabic al-hinna (see henna). As the name of the plant itself, from 1560s.

Related entries & more 
hoya (n.)

"honey-plant," climbing, flowering plant of southeast Asia, 1816, named in Modern Latin in honor of English gardener and botanist Thomas Hoy (c. 1750-1822).

Related entries & more 
spikenard (n.)

mid-14c., "aromatic substance from an Indian plant, famous perfumed unguent of the ancients," from Medieval Latin spica nardi (see spike (n.2)), rendering Greek nardou stakhys, in which the other element probably ultimately from Sanskrit nalada-, the name of the plant.

Related entries & more 
phytoplankton (n.)

"microscopic marine algae, the plant parts of the plankton community," 1897, from phyto- + plankton.

Related entries & more 

Page 4