Etymology
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jackstraw (n.)
1590s, "effigy of a man made of straw," from Jack + straw (n.); hence "man without substance or means." It also was a name of one of the leaders of the Peasants' Revolt of 1381. As the name of a game played with straw or strips, from 1801. Related: Jackstraws.
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inhumanity (n.)

"barbarous cruelty," late 15c., from French inhumanité (14c.) or directly from Latin inhumanitatem (nominative inhumanitas) "inhuman conduct, savageness; incivility, rudeness," noun of quality from inhumanus "inhuman, savage, cruel" (see inhuman).

And Man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn,—
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!
[Robert Burns, "Man was Made to Mourn," 1784]
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polyester (n.)

1929, "a polymer in which the units are joined by the ester linkage," formed from polymer + ester. Man-made polyester fiber was discovered in 1941.

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jeroboam (n.)
type of large wine bottle, 1816, from Biblical name Jeroboam, "a mighty man of valour" (I Kings xi.28) "who made Israel to sin" (xiv.16), from Hebrew Yarobh'am, literally "let the people increase."
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co-respondent (n.)

in law, a joint respondent, one proceeded against along with another or others, 1857, from co- + respondent. "[S]pecifically, in Eng. law, a man charged with adultery, and made a party together with the wife to the husband's suit for divorce." [Century Dictionary].

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anthropolatry (n.)

"worship of a human being," 1650s, from Greek anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + latreia "hired labor, service, worship" (see -latry). The accusation was made by pagans against Christians and by Christians against pagans. The word figured in Church disputes about the nature of Christ.

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slouch (n.)
1510s, "lazy man," variant of slouk (1560s), probably from a Scandinavian source, perhaps Old Norse slokr "lazy fellow," and related to slack (adj.) on the notion of "sagging, drooping." Meaning "stooping of the head and shoulders" first recorded 1725. Slouch hat, made of soft material, first attested 1764.
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nabob (n.)

1610s, "deputy governor of an Indian province under the Mogul Empire," Anglo-Indian, from Hindi nabab, from Arabic nuwwab, honorific plural of na'ib "viceroy, deputy," from base n-w-b "to take someone's place." Also used colloquially of Europeans who came home from India having made a fortune there, hence "very rich man" (1764).

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pacemaker (n.)

also pace-maker, 1884, "one who sets the pace for others," originally a rider or boat that sets the pace for others in training. Meaning "the node of the heart which determines the beat rate" is from 1910; sense of "man-made device for stimulating and regulating heartbeat" (short for artificial pacemaker) is from 1951. From pace (n.) + maker.

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barrage (n.)
1859, "action of barring; man-made barrier in a stream" (for irrigation, etc.), from French barrer "to stop," from barre "bar," from Old French barre (see bar (n.1)). Artillery sense is 1916, from World War I French phrase tir de barrage "barrier fire" intended to isolate the objective. As a verb by 1917. Related: Barraged; barraging.
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