Etymology
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incorporate (v.)

late 14c., "to put (something) into the body or substance of (something else), blend; absorb, eat," also "solidify, harden," often in medical writing, from Late Latin incorporatus, past participle of incorporare "unite into one body, embody, include," from Latin in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + verb from corpus (genitive corporis) "body" (from PIE root *kwrep- "body, form, appearance").

Meaning "to legally form a body politic with perpetual succession and power to act as one person, establish as a legal corporation" is from mid-15c. (A verb corporate was used in this sense from early 15c.) Intransitive sense of "unite with another body so as to become part of it" is from 1590s. Related: Incorporated; incorporating.

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cooties (n.)

originally "body lice," 1917, see cootie.

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cadaver (n.)

"a dead body, a corpse," late 14c., from Latin cadaver "dead body (of men or animals)," probably from a perfective participle of cadere "to fall, sink, settle down, decline, perish," from PIE root *kad- "to fall." Compare Greek ptoma "dead body," literally "a fall" (see ptomaine); poetic English the fallen "those who have died in battle."

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carcass (n.)

"dead body of an animal," late 13c., from Anglo-French carcois, from or influenced by Old French charcois (Modern French carcasse) "trunk of a body, chest, carcass," and Anglo-Latin carcosium "dead body," all of unknown origin; original form uncertain. It may have been assimilated to Latin caro "flesh." Not used of humans after c. 1750, except contemptuously. Italian carcassa probably is a French loan-word.

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momentum (n.)

1690s in the scientific use in mechanics, "product of the mass and velocity of a body; quantity of motion of a moving body," from Latin momentum "movement, moving power" (see moment). Figurative use, "force gained by movement, an impulse, impelling force," dates from 1782.

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antibody (n.)

"substance developed in blood as an antitoxin," 1901, a hybrid formed from anti- "against" + body. Probably a translation of German Antikörper, condensed from a phrase such as anti-toxischer Körper "anti-toxic body" (1891).

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able-bodied (adj.)

"healthy and sufficiently strong," 1620s; see able + body.

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b.o. (n.)

by c. 1950, an abbreviation of body odor; an advertisers' invention.

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disembody (v.)

1714, "divest of a body, free from flesh," of a soul or spirit, "separate from a body," from dis- "not" + embody. Related: Disembodiment "act or condition of being disembodied" (1837); earlier it was used of the disbanding of military regiments (1804).

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legislature (n.)

"a body of lawmakers," 1670s; see legislator + -ure.

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