Etymology
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maleness (n.)

1660s, "masculinity," from male (adj.) + -ness. By 1890 as "state or quality of being of the male sex."

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manchild (n.)

also man-child, "male child, male infant," late 14c., from man (n.) + child.

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spore (n.)

"reproductive body in flowerless plants corresponding to the seeds of flowering ones," 1836, from Modern Latin spora, from Greek spora "a seed, a sowing, seed-time," related to sporas "scattered, dispersed," sporos "a sowing," from PIE *spor-, variant of root *sper- "to spread, sow" (see sparse).

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prostate (n.)

"the prostate gland," 1640s, from French prostate, from Medieval Latin prostata "the prostate," from Greek prostatēs (adēn) "prostate (gland)," from prostatēs "leader, ruler, guardian; one standing in front," from proistanai "set before," from pro "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + histanai "cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." So called from its position at the base of the bladder and immediately in front of its mouth. Related: Prostatic.

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thymine (n.)

nitrogenous base, 1894, from German (Kossel and Neumann, 1893), from thymic acid, from which it was isolated, the acid so called because obtained from the thymus gland. With chemical suffix -ine (2).

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androphobia (n.)

"morbid fear of the male sex" (sometimes, rather, "of the human race" or "of crowds"), 1844, from andro- "man, male" + -phobia. Related: Androphobic.

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mallard (n.)

c. 1300, "wild drake or duck," from Old French malart (12c.) or Medieval Latin mallardus, apparently from male, from Latin masculus (see male), in which case the original sense probably was not of a specific species but of any male wild duck, though the specific sense of "male of the wild duck" is not attested in English until early 14c.

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biological (adj.)

"pertaining to the science of life," 1840, from biology + -ical. Biological clock, "innate mechanism that regulates cyclic activities of living things," is attested from 1955; not especially of human reproductive urges until c. 1991. Biological warfare is attested from 1946. Related: Biologically. Alternative adjective biologic is from 1850.

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melatonin (n.)

chemical formed in the pineal gland of mammals that regulates certain physiological activities, 1958, from Greek melas "black, dark" (see melano-) + ending from serotonin. So called because its secretion is inhibited by sunlight, or because it changes the skin color of certain reptiles and amphibians.

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androgen (n.)

"male sex hormone," 1936, from andro- "man, male" + -gen "thing that produces or causes."

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