Etymology
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beadwork (n.)
also bead-work, 1762, from bead (n.) + work (n.).
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brickwork (n.)
"building work done in brick," 1570s, from brick (n.) + work (n.).
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piecework (n.)

also piece-work, "work done and paid for by measure or quantity" in contradistinction to work done and paid for by measure of time, 1540s, from piece (n.1) + work (n.) in the sense of "a distinct job or operation taken separately." Related: Pieceworker.

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official (adj.)

late 14c., "performing a service" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1400, "required by duty," from Old French oficial "official; main, principal" (14c., Modern French officiel) and directly from Late Latin officialis "of or belonging to duty, service, or office," from Latin officium "service, kindness, favor; official duty, function, business; ceremonial observance," literally "work-doing," from ops (genitive opis) "power, might, abundance, means" (related to opus "work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance") + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Meaning "pertaining to an office or official position" is from c. 1600. That of "derived from the proper office or officer," hence "authorized," is by 1854.

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overwork (v.)

"to cause to work too hard," 1520s, from over- + work (v.). The figurative sense of "to work into a state of excitement and confusion" is by 1640s. Old English oferwyrcan meant "to work all over," i.e. "to decorate the whole surface of." Related: Overworked; overworking.

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handiwork (n.)
late 12c., from Old English handgeweorc "work of the hand, creation," from hand (n.) + geweorc, collective form of weorc "work" (see work (n.)). Old English collective prefix ge- regularly reduces to i- in Middle English, and the word probably came to be felt as handy + work.
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toil (n.1)
"hard work," c. 1300, originally "turmoil, contention, dispute," from Anglo-French toil (13c.), from toiler "agitate, stir up, entangle, writhe about," from Old French toeillier "drag about, make dirty" (12c.), usually said to be from Latin tudiculare "crush with a small hammer," from tudicula "mill for crushing olives, instrument for crushing," from Latin tudes "hammer," from PIE *tud-, variant of *(s)teu- "to push, stroke, knock, beat" (see obtuse). Sense of "hard work, labor" (1590s) is from the related verb (see toil (v.)).
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grunt (n.)
1550s, from grunt (v.); as a type of fish, from 1713, so called from the noise they make when hauled from the water; meaning "infantry soldier" emerged in U.S. military slang during Vietnam War (first recorded in print 1969); used since 1900 of various low-level workers. Grunt work first recorded 1977.
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paperwork (n.)
1580s, "things made of paper," from paper (n.) + work (n.). Meaning "work done on paper" is from 1889.
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opus (n.)

"a work, composition," especially a musical one, 1809, from Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion" (source of Italian opera, French oeuvre, Spanish obra), from Proto-Italic *opes- "work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance." The plural, seldom used as such, is opera. Opus Dei, literally "the work of God," is a Catholic organization founded in Spain in 1928 to re-establish Christian ideals in society through examples of the lives of the members.

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