Etymology
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Saville Row 

also Savile Row, fashionable street in London, noted for its tailors' shops since at least 1870; hence, metonymically, "fashionable tailoring," by 1893. The street name itself dates to mid-18c. and is named for the aristocratic family that formerly had an estate nearby. It was a fashionable neighborhood early 19c., which might have attracted the tailors.

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Tyburn 
place of public execution for Middlesex from c. 1200 to 1783; it stood at the junction of modern Oxford Street, Bayswater Road and Edgware Road.
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double-decker (n.)

1835, of ships, "with two decks above the water line;" 1867, of street vehicles, "with two floors;" see double (adj.) + deck (n.).

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mainstay (n.)

"chief support," 1787, a figurative use of a nautical noun meaning "stay which extends from the main-top to the foot of the foremast" (late 15c.), from main (adj.) + stay (n.).

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newsboy (n.)

also news-boy, "boy who hawks newspapers on the street or delivers them to houses," 1764, from news (n.) + boy.

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short (n.)
1580s, the short "the result, the total," from short (adj.). Meaning "electrical short circuit" first recorded 1906 (see short circuit). Meaning "contraction of a name or phrase" is from 1873 (as in for short). Slang meaning "car" is attested from 1897; originally "street car," so called because street cars (or the rides taken in them) were "shorter" than railroad cars.
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mainmast (n.)

also main-mast, "the tallest mast in a sailing ship," late 15c., from main (adj.) + mast (n.1). In three-masted vessels, the middle mast; in four-masted ships the second from the bow.

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piazza (n.)

1580s, "open public square in an Italian town," from Italian piazza, from Latin platea "courtyard, broad street," from Greek plateia (hodos) "broad (street)," from platys "broad, flat" (from PIE root *plat- "to spread"). According to OED, mistakenly applied in English 1640s to the colonnade of Covent Garden, designed by Inigo Jones, rather than to the marketplace itself; hence "the veranda of a house" (1724, chiefly American English).

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Piccadilly 

street and circus in London, named for Pickadilly Hall, a house that once stood there; the name is of uncertain origin.

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