Etymology
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bullfrog (n.)
also bull-frog, large North American species of frog, 1738, from bull (n.1) + frog (n.1). So called for its loud voice.
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plangent (adj.)

"beating with a loud sound," 1822, from Latin plangentem (nominative plangens), present participle of plangere "to strike, beat" (from PIE root *plak- (2) "to strike"). Related: Plangently; plangency.

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vociferation (n.)

c. 1400, from Latin vociferationem (nominative vociferatio), "a loud calling, clamor, outcry," noun of action from past-participle stem of vociferari "to shout, yell, cry out" (see vociferous).

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pianoforte (n.)

1767, from Italian, from piano e forte "soft and loud," in full, gravicembalo col piano e forte "harpsichord with soft and loud" (c. 1710), said to have been so named by inventor Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655-1731) of Padua because the ability via dampers to vary the tone is one of the main changes from the harpsichord. Italian piano (adj.) ultimately is from Latin planus "flat, smooth, even," later "soft" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). Also fortepiano.

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clang (v.)

"make a loud, sharp, resonant, metallic sounds," 1570s (intransitive), echoic (originally of trumpets and birds), akin to or from Latin clangere "resound, ring," and Greek klange "sharp sound," from PIE *klang-, nasalized form of root *kleg- "to cry, sound." Transitive sense is by 1850. Related: Clanged; clanging.

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clap (n.1)

"a sudden, sharp, loud noise," c. 1200, from clap (v.). Of thunder, late 14c. Meaning "sudden blow" is from c. 1400; meaning "noise made by slapping the palms of the hands together" is from 1590s.

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boom (n.2)
"loud, deep, hollow, continued sound," c. 1500, from boom (v.). Compare boondi Aboriginal word for waves breaking on a beach (source of Sydney's Bondi Beach), said to be imitative of the sound.
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smack (n.2)
"smart, sharp sound made by the lips," 1560s, from smack (v.1). Meaning "a loud kiss" is recorded from c. 1600. Meaning "sharp sound made by hitting something with the flat of the hand" is from c. 1746.
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bang (n.)

1540s, "heavy, resounding blow;" see bang (v.). Meaning "loud, sudden explosive noise" is by 1855.

This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper
[T.S. Eliot, from "Hollow Men," 1925]
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bray (v.)
"utter a loud and harsh cry," c. 1300, from Old French braire "to cry," from Gallo-Roman *bragire "to cry out" (11c.), perhaps from a Celtic source (compare Gaelic braigh "to shriek, crackle"), probably imitative. Related: Brayed; braying.
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