Etymology
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lyso- 
word-forming element indicating "loosening, dissolving, freeing," before vowels lys-, from Greek lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to loose, loosen," from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart."
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peignoir (n.)

"lady's loose robe," 1835, from French peignoir, from Middle French peignouoir "loose, washable garment worn over the shoulders while combing the hair" (16c.), from peigner "to comb the hair," from Latin pectinare, from pecten (genitive pectinis) "a comb," related to pectere "to comb" (see fight (v.)). A gown put on while coming from the bath; misapplied in English to a woman's morning gown.

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lush (adj.)
mid-15c., "lax, flaccid, soft, tender" (obsolete or dialectal), from Old French lasche "soft, loose, slack, negligent, cowardly," from laschier "loosen," from Late Latin laxicare "become shaky," related to Latin laxare "loosen," from laxus "loose" (from PIE root *sleg- "be slack, be languid"). The main modern sense of the word, with reference to plant life, "luxuriant in growth," is first attested c. 1600, in Shakespeare. Related: Lushly; lushness.
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molder (v.)

also moulder, "to crumble away, turn to mold or dust by natural decay," 1530s, probably frequentative based on mold (n.3) "loose earth." Related: Moldered; moldering.

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folder (n.)
1550s, "one who folds;" 1903, "folding cover for loose papers" (earlier as "a fold-up document," often a railway timetable or map); agent noun from fold (v.).
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middy (n.)
colloquial abbreviation of midshipman, by 1818. As "loose, long type of women's blouse," 1911, from resemblance to shirts worn by midshipmen.
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laxity (n.)

1520s, from French laxité, from Latin laxitatem (nominative laxitas) "width, spaciousness," from laxus "loose, lax" (see lax). An earlier noun was laxation (late 14c.). Laxness is from 1630s.

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tufa (n.)
type of porous rock, 1770, from Italian tufa "tufa, porous rock," probably from Latin tufus, tophus "loose, porous volcanic rock," said to be an Oscan-Umbrian loan-word. Related: Tufaceous.
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overalls (n.)

"loose trousers of a strong material worn by cowboys, etc.," 1782, from over (adv.) + all. Specific sense "loose fitting canvas trousers with a bib and strap top" (originally worn by workmen over other clothes to protect them from wet, dirt, etc.) is attested by 1897. Compare French surtout "overcoat," literally "an over all," from sur- "over" + tout "all."

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handbill (n.)
loose paper circulated by hand to make a public announcement, 1753, from hand (n.) + bill (n.1). Also applied to posted bills.
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