Etymology
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long-ago (adj.)
1834, from the adverbial phrase, "far away in past time;" see long (adv.) + ago. As a noun from 1842.
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long-drawn (adj.)
"protracted," 1640s, from long (adv.) + drawn.
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long run (n.)

also long-run, "ultimate outcome," 1620s, from long (adj.) + run (n.); the notion is "when events have run their course," as in the phrase in the long run "after a long course of experience." As an adjective from 1804.

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long-distance (adj.)

1878, in reference to telephoning (1876 of railway fares and traffic), from long (adj.) + distance (n.).

Lieut. G.R.R. Savage, R.E., writing from Roorkee, North-West Provinces, India, sends us an account of some interesting experiments he has been making on long-distance telephones. He constructed telephones expressly for long-distance work, and succeeded in getting a bugle-call heard distinctly over 400 miles of Government telegraph line .... ["Nature," May 16, 1878]
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long-playing (adj.)
1910, of gramophone recordings, from long (adv.) + present participle of play (v.).
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long-running (adj.)
1943, of theatrical productions, from long (adv.) + present participle of run (v.). Related: Longest-running.
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long-boat (n.)
longest and strongest boat on a sailing ship, 1510s, from long (adj.) + boat (n.).
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part-time (adj.)

also parttime, "employed, occurring, or lasting for less than the usual time," 1891, from part (n.) + time (n.). Related: Part-timer.

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time-honored (adj.)
also time-honoured, 1590s; from time (n.) + past participle of honor (v.).
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