Etymology
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Lockean (adj.)

1831, "pertaining to or characteristic of John Locke" (1632-1704), greatest of the English metaphysicians. The surname means one with fine curls or else one who lives near, or operates, a canal lock.

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heart-breaker (n.)
also heartbreaker, 1660s, originally "a fetching lock of hair;" of persons, "one who breaks hearts," from 1863; agent noun formation; see heartbreak.
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flocculent (adj.)
"resembling wool, fleecy," 1800, from Latin floccus "lock of hair, tuft of wool," a word of unknown origin, + -ulent. Related: Flocculence.
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slot (n.2)

"bar or bolt used to fasten a door, window, etc.," c. 1300, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German slot (compare Old Norse slot, Old High German sloz, German Schloss "bolt, bar, lock, castle;" Old Saxon slutil "key," Dutch slot "a bolt, lock, castle"), from Proto-Germanic stem *slut- "to close" (source also of Old Frisian sluta, Dutch sluiten, Old High German sliozan, German schliessen "to shut, close, bolt, lock"), from PIE root *klau- "hook," also "peg, nail, pin," all things used as locks or bolts in primitive structures.

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flock (n.2)
"tuft of wool," mid-13c., also found in continental Germanic and Scandinavian, all probably from Old French floc, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool, lock of hair," a word of unknown origin.
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cirrous (adj.)

1650s in biology, "having or resembling a tendril;" 1815 in meteorology, from Latin cirrus "lock of hair, tendril" (see cirrus) + -ous. Also sometimes cirrose.

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ringlet (n.)

1550s, "circlet, ring other than a finger ring," from ring (n.1) + diminutive suffix -let. As "a curl of hair," usually a long and spiraled lock, by 1660s. Related: Ringleted.

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cirro- 

word-forming element meaning, in meteorology, "involving cirrus clouds," and, in biology, "involving a tendril or tendrils," from combining form of Latin cirrus "lock of hair, tendril" (see cirrus).

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balance-beam (n.)
1798 as the cross-piece of a scales, 1813 as a type of device on a drawbridge, canal-lock, etc., from balance (n.) + beam (n.). From 1893 as a type of gymnastics apparatus.
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calaboose (n.)
"prison, a common jail or lock-up," 1792, Western and Southwestern American English, from Louisiana French calabouse, from Spanish calabozo "dungeon," probably from Vulgar Latin *calafodium, from pre-Roman *cala "protected place, den" + Latin fodere "to dig" (see fossil).
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