Etymology
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omer (n.)

Hebrew measure of capacity (a little over 5 pints), 1610s, from Hebrew 'omer.

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nimiety (n.)

"excess, redundancy, state of being too much," 1560s, from Latin nimietas "excessiveness," from nimius "beyond measure, excessive," from nimis (adv.) "too much, beyond measure, excessively," from *ne-mis- "not little," from PIE root *ne- "not" + *mi- "little," from PIE root *mei- (2) "small."

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tuffet (n.)

1550s, "little tuft," from Old French touffel (with diminutive suffix -et for French -el), diminutive of touffe (see tuft). Obsolete except in the nursery rhyme "Little Miss Muffet" (1843), where it has been felt to mean "hassock, footstool."

LITTLE Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet
And made of her knees such display
That the old fashioned spider,
Embarrassed beside her,
Was actually frightened away!
[Life magazine, Oct. 1, 1927]
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burrito (n.)
Mexican food dish, 1934, from Spanish, literally "little burro" (see burro).
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lambkin (n.)
1570s, "little lamb" (mid-13c. as a surname), from lamb + diminutive suffix -kin.
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fajitas (n.)

traditional Tex-Mex dish consisting of strips of meat, chopped vegetables, and cheese wrapped in a tortilla, by 1977, from Mexican Spanish fajita, literally "little strip, little belt," a diminutive of Spanish faja "strip, belt, wrapper," from Latin fascia "band" (see fasces).

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droplet (n.)

"a little drop," c. 1600, from drop (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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instill (v.)
also instil, early 15c., "to introduce (liquid, feelings, etc.) little by little," from Latin instillare "put in by drops; to drop, trickle," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + stilla "a drop" (see distill). Related: Instilled; instiller; instilling.
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raw-boned (adj.)

"having little flesh on the bones, gaunt," 1590s (Shakespeare), from raw (adj.) + bone (n.).

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de minimis 
Latin, literally "of little things," thus, "so minor as to not be worth regarding."
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