Etymology
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Panslavism (n.)

also pan-slavism, "ideal of a united civilization and literature of the Slavic peoples; movement for the union of the Slavic peoples under the hegemony of Russia," 1846, from German Pansclavismus, coined as a linguistic term by Herkel in 1826. Related: Panslavic.

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boffin (n.)
"person engaged in innovative research," especially in aviation, 1945; earlier "elderly naval officer" (1941), of uncertain origin, probably from one of the "Mr. Boffins" of English literature (as in "Our Mutual Friend").
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stock (adj.)
in reference to conversation, literature, "recurring, commonplace" (as in stock phrase), 1738, figurative use from sense "kept in store for constant use" (1620s), from stock (n.2).
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gritty (adj.)
1590s, "resembling or containing sand or grit," from grit (n.) + -y (2). In sense of "unpleasant" (of literature, etc.), from 1882, in reference to the sensation of eating gritty bread. Meaning "plucky, spirited, courageous and resolute" is from 1847. Related: Grittily; grittiness.
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Nobel 
1900, in reference to five prizes (in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace) established in the will of Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), Swedish chemist and engineer, inventor of dynamite. A sixth prize, in economics, was added in 1969. Related: Nobelist.
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bitterness (n.)
Old English biternys "bitterness, grief;" see bitter + -ness. Figurative sense (of feelings, etc.) is attested earlier than literal sense (of taste), which will surprise no one who reads any amount of Anglo-Saxon literature.
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Cid 

el Cid, title applied in Spanish literature to dauntless Castilian nobleman and warlord Ruy Diaz, Count of Bivar (c.1040-1099), champion of the Christian religion and the old Spanish monarchy against the Moors,  1680s, from Spanish cid "chief, commander," from Arabic sayyid "lord."

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cinquecento (n.)

also cinque-cento, "the sixteenth century" (in reference to Italian art and literature), 1760, from Italian cinquecento, literally "500," short for mil cinquecento "1500." See cinque + hundred, and compare quattrocento. Also as an adjective.

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bricolage (n.)

term used in arts and literature, "work made from available things," by 1966, via Lévi-Strauss, from French bricolage, from bricoler "to fiddle, tinker" and, by extension, "make creative and resourceful use of whatever materials are to hand (regardless of their original purpose)," 16c., from bricole (14c.).

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philhellene (adj.)

1824, "a friend of Greece, a foreigner who supports and assists the cause of the Greeks," from Greek philhellēn, from philos "loving" (see philo-) + Hellēnes "the Greeks" (compare Hellenic). Originally in English in reference to the cause of Greek independence; later also with reference to Greek literature or language. Related: Philhellenic; Philhellenism.

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