Etymology
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Genro (n.)
"elder statesman of Japan," 1876, from Japanese, literally "first elders."
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en route 
1779, French, literally "on the way" (see route (n.)).
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Lhasa 
capital of Tibet, Tibetan, literally "city of the gods," from lha "god" + sa "city." The Lhasa apso type of dog is so called from 1935 in English, from Tibetan, literally "Lhasa terrier." Earlier name in English was Lhasa terrier (1894).
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Liebfraumilch (n.)
German white wine, 1833, from German, literally "milk of Our Lady."
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Dempsey 

surname, from Irish Ó Diomasaigh "descendant of Diomasach," which is literally "proud."

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Thai 
1808, native name, Tai, literally "free."
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Edam (adj.)
1836, type of cheese named for Edam, village in Holland where it was originally made. The place name is literally "the dam on the River Ye," which flows into the Ijsselmeer there, and the river name is literally "river" (see ea).
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Korea 
by 1690s, from Chinese Gao li, name of a dynasty founded 918, literally "high serenity." Japanese Chosen is from Korean Choson, literally "land of morning calm," from cho "morning" + son "calm." Related: Korean (1610s). In early use Corea, Corean.
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chou (n.)

"fashionable knot in a woman's dress or hat," 1883; earlier "small, round, cream-filled pastry" (1706), from French chou, literally "cabbage" (12c.), from Latin caulis "cabbage," literally "stalk" (see cole (n.1)).

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materia medica (n.)

"substances used in medicine," 1690s, Latin, literally "medical matter."

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