Etymology
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hemline (n.)

also hem-line, 1899, from hem (n.) + line (n.).

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controlling (adj.)

"overbearing," 1570s, present-participle adjective from control (v.). Related: Controllingly.

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rectilinear (adj.)

1650s, "forming a straight line," with -ar + rectiline (1560s), from Late Latin rectilineus, from rectus "straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line") + linea "line" (see line (n.)). Of a figure, "bounded by straight lines," 1728. Related: Rectilineal "straight-lined" (1640s); rectilinearity.

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baseline (n.)

also base-line, "line upon which others depend," 1750, originally in surveying, from base (n.) + line (n.). In tennis, the end-line of the court (1872). The baseball diamond sense is from 1867. Baseline estimate was in use by 1983.

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waistline (n.)

also waist-line, 1867, from waist + line (n.).

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fader (n.)

sound control device, 1931, agent noun from fade (v.).

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controllable (adj.)

"capable of being checked or restrained," c. 1600, from control (v.) + -able.

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neckline (n.)

also neck-line, "shape of the top of a woman's garment at the front," 1900, from neck (n.) + line (n.).

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hairline (n.)

also hair-line, "cord made of hair," 1731, from hair + line (n.). Meaning "a very fine line" is from 1846. As "the outline of the hair on top of the head," by 1903. As an adjective, of cracks, etc., 1904.

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receivership (n.)

late 15c., "office of a receiver of public revenues," from receiver + -ship. As "condition of being under control of a receiver," 1884.

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