Etymology
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neocolonialism (n.)

also neo-colonialism, "the exertion of influence or control over other nations, especially former dependencies, without direct military or political control," 1955, from neo- "new" + colonialism.

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waterline (n.)
also water-line, 1620s, line where the water rises to on the hull of a ship afloat, from water (n.1) + line (n.).
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shoreline (n.)

also shore-line, "line where the shore and the water meet," by 1839 in the geographical sense, from shore (n.) + line (n.).

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uncontrolled (adj.)
1510s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of control (v.).
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hemline (n.)
also hem-line, 1899, from hem (n.) + line (n.).
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baseline (n.)

also base-line, "line upon which others depend," 1750, originally in surveying, from base (n.) + line (n.). In tennis, the end-line of the court (1872). Baseball diamond sense is from 1867. Baseline estimate in use by 1983.

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rectilinear (adj.)

1650s, "forming a straight line," with -ar + rectiline (1560s), from Late Latin rectilineus, from rectus "straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line") + linea "line" (see line (n.)). Of a figure, "bounded by straight lines," 1728. Related: Rectilineal "straight-lined" (1640s); rectilinearity.

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waistline (n.)
also waist-line, 1867, from waist + line (n.).
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controlling (adj.)

"overbearing," 1570s, present-participle adjective from control (v.). Related: Controllingly.

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CDC 
abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.
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