Etymology
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leftish (adj.)
1934, in the political sense, from left (adj.) + -ish. Related: Leftishness.
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relict (n.)

"a widow," mid-15c., relicte, etymologically "one who is left, one who remains," from Old French relict, fem. relicte, "person or thing left behind" (especially a widow) and directly from Medieval Latin relicta "a widow," noun use of fem. of relictus "abandoned, left behind," past-participle adjective from Latin relinquere "leave behind, forsake, abandon, give up," from re- "back" (see re-) + linquere "to leave" (from PIE *linkw-, nasalized form of root *leikw- "to leave").

In later only a semi-legal or formal term (perhaps from confusion with relic), "more often seen than heard" [Fowler]. Also as an adjective in Middle English and early modern English, originally "left undisturbed or untouched, allowed to remain" (mid-15c.) but used in various senses.

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boustrophedon (n.)
ancient form of writing with lines alternately written left-to-right and right-to-left, 1783, Greek, literally "turning as an ox in plowing," from bous "ox" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn").
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monophobia (n.)

"morbid dread of being left alone," 1879, from mono- "alone" + -phobia "irrational fear of." Related: Monophobic.

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dextral (adj.)

1640s, "right as opposed to left," from Medieval Latin dexteralis "on the right," from Latin dexter "right, opposite of left," from PIE root *deks-. From 1871 as "right-handed." By 1818 in reference to univalve shells, "having the aperture on the right side when held upright in front of the observer with the apex upward." Related: Dextrally; dextrality.

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portsider (n.)

"left-handed person," 1913, American English baseball slang, from port (n.4) in the nautical sense + side (n.).

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reliquiae (n.)

"remains (as those of fossil organisms)," 1650s, Latin plural of reliquus "remainder, residue," noun use of an adjective meaning "that is left, remaining, left over," a derivative of relinquere (perfective reliqui) "to leave behind, forsake, abandon, give up," from re- "back" (see re-) + linquere "to leave" (from PIE *linkw-, nasalized form of root *leikw- "to leave"). As "literary remains," by 1933.

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Hydrus 

"fabulous water serpent," 1660s, from Latin Hydrus, from Greek hydros "water-snake" (see hydra). The constellation (attested by 1670s in English) was one of the 11 added to Ptolemy's list in the 1610s by Flemish cartographer Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) after Europeans began to explore the Southern Hemisphere.

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antistrophe (n.)

part of an ancient Greek choral ode, 1610s, from Latin, from Greek antistrophē "the returning of the chorus," "answering to a previous [strophe], except that they now moved from left to right instead of from right to left" [Liddell & Scott], literally "a turning about, a turning back," from antistrephein, from anti "opposite, in opposition to; in return" (see anti-) + strephein "to turn" (from PIE root *streb(h)- "to wind, turn"). Related: Antistrophic.

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interleaf (n.)
"extra page in a book," usually left blank and for taking notes, 1741, from inter- "between" + leaf (n.).
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