Etymology
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unlearned (adj.)
c. 1400, "ignorant," from un- (1) "not" + learned (adj.). From 1530s as "not acquired by learning," from past participle of learn (v.). Old English had unlæred.
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mullah (n.)
title given in Muslim lands to one learned in theology and sacred law, 1610s, from Turkish molla, Persian and Urdu mulla, from Arabic mawla "master," from waliya "reigned, governed."
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philosophical (adj.)

late 14c., "learned, skilled in learning;" c. 1500 as "related or belonging to philosophy or philosophers;" see philosophy + -ical. Related: Philosophically.

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Talmud (n.)
body of Jewish traditional ceremonial and civil law, 1530s, from late Hebrew talmud "instruction" (c. 130 C.E.), from lamadh "he learned." Related: Talmudic; Talmudist.
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could (v.)

Old English cuðe, past tense of cunnan "to be able" (see can (v.1)); ending changed 14c. to standard English -d(e). The unetymological -l- was added 15c.-16c. on model of would, should, where it is historical. Could be as a response to a suggestion, indicating it may be correct, is by 1938.

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mathematician (n.)

"one skilled or learned in mathematics," early 15c., mathematicion, from Old French mathematicien, from mathematique, from Latin mathematicus "of or belonging to mathematics," from Latin mathematica (see mathematic).

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autoimmune (adj.)

also auto-immune, "arising from an abnormal immune response to a normal body part," 1952, from auto- + immune. Related: Autoimmunity, attested by 1903 as "immunity, natural or acquired, effected by the unaided powers of the organism, independent of external agencies." Modern sense of "immune responses of an organism against its own healthy cells and tissues" is from 1950s.

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crafty (adj.)

mid-12c., crafti, "skillful, clever, learned," from Old English cræftig "strong, powerful," later "skillful, ingenious," acquiring after c. 1200 a bad sense of "cunning, sly, skillful in scheming," the main modern sense (but through 15c. also "skillfully done or made; intelligent, learned; artful, scientific"); see craft (n.) + -y (2). Perhaps to retain a distinctly positive sense, Middle English also used craftious as "skillful, artistic" (mid-15c.). Related: Craftily; craftiness.

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Wiffle 
hollow, perforated plastic ball, registered trademark name (The Wiffle Ball Inc., Shelton, Connecticut, U.S.), claiming use from 1954. According to the company, designed in 1953 by David N. Mullany "in response to a lack of field space and numerous broken windows by his baseball-playing son," the name based on whiff (q.v.), baseball slang for a missed swing.
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vagrant (adj.)
early 15c., from Anglo-French vagarant, waucrant, and sharing with it the history to be found under vagrant (n.). Dogberry's corruption vagrom ("Much Ado about Nothing") persisted through 19c. in learned jocularity.
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