Etymology
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Noh 

traditional Japanese masked drama, 1871, from Japanese, literally "ability, talent, accomplishment, function." A dramatic form also known as nogaku, with gaku "music."

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explicative (adj.)

1640s, "having the function of explaining," from Latin explicativus, from explicat-, past participle stem of explicare "unfold; explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). As a noun, from 1775.

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flatline (v.)

"give no indication of life, cease to function," by 1998, from the flat (adj.) line (n.) on an electrocardiogram or electroencephalogram when the patient is dead. Related: Flatlined; flatlining.

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semiotics (n.)

1660s, in medicine, "branch of pathology concerned with the body's symptoms;" from semiotic; also see -ics. The meaning "study or doctrine of signs and symbols with special regard to function and origin" is by 1880. 

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neurology (n.)

"scientific study of the form and function of the nervous system," 1680s, from Modern Latin neurologia, from Modern Greek neurologia (1660s), from neuro- "nerves, the nervous system" (see neuro-) + -logia "study" (see -logy). Related: Neurological (1755).

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metier (n.)

"one's skill, talent, or calling," 1792, from French métier "trade, profession," from Old French mestier "task, affair, service, function, duty," from Gallo-Roman *misterium, from Latin ministerium "office, service," from minister "servant" (see minister (n.)).

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odalisque (n.)

"female slave or concubine in a harem," 1680s, from French odalisque (1660s), from Turkish odaliq "maidservant," from odah "room in a harem," literally "chamber, hall," + -liq, suffix expressing function. In French, the suffix was confused with -isque, which is ultimately from Greek -isk(os) "of the nature of, belonging to."

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biofeedback (n.)

also bio-feedback, "use of electronics to monitor an automatic bodily function to train a person to control it," 1969, from bio- + feedback. Said to have been coined by U.S. psychologist and parapsychologist Gardner Murphy.

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defunct (adj.)

"dead, deceased, extinct," 1590s, from Old French defunct (14c., Modern French defunt) or directly from Latin defunctus "dead," literally "off-duty," past-participle adjective from defungi "to discharge, finish," from de- "off, completely" (see de-) + fungi "perform or discharge duty" (see function (n.)).

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clan (n.)

"a family, a tribe," especially, among the Highlanders of Scotland, a form of social organization consisting of a tribe holding land in common under leadership of a chieftain, early 15c., from Gaelic clann "family, stock, offspring," akin to Old Irish cland "offspring, tribe," both from Latin planta "offshoot" (see plant (n.)).

The Goidelic branch of Celtic (including Gaelic) had no initial p-, so it substituted k- or c- for Latin p-. The same Latin word in (non-Goidelic) Middle Welsh became plant "children."

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