Etymology
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commedia dell'arte (n.)

"improvised popular comedy involving stock characters," 1823, Italian, literally "comedy of art;" see comedy + art (n.).

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Mojave 

Native American people of Yuman stock living along the Colorado River, also Mohave, 1831, from native (Yuman) name, hamakhaav, perhaps containing aha "water."

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overstock (v.)

"to supply in excess of what is wanted, to glut," 1640s, from over- + stock (v.). Related: Overstocked; overstocking. The noun, "superabundance," is attested by 1710.

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overfish (v.)

also over-fish, "to fish too much, so as to unduly diminish the stock or supply of," 1813, from over- + fish (v.). Related: Overfished; overfishing.

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alpenstock (n.)
"long iron-pointed staff used for hiking in mountains," 1829, German, literally "Alpine stick;" see Alp + stock (n.1).
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bullish (adj.)
1560s, "of the nature of a bull," from bull (n.1) + -ish; stock market sense "tending to advance in price" is from 1882. Related: Bullishly; bullishness.
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futures (n.)
"goods sold on agreement for future delivery," 1880, from future (n.) in a financial sense "speculative purchase or sale of stock or other commodities for future delivery."
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thoroughbred (adj.)
1701, of persons, "thoroughly accomplished," from thorough + past tense of breed. In reference to horses, "of pure breed or stock," from 1796; the noun is first recorded 1842.
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overhunt (v.)

also over-hunt, "to hunt too much, so as to unduly diminish the stock or supply of," 1862, from over- + hunt (v.). Related: Overhunted; overhunting.

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stocks (n.)
instrument of punishment and confinement formerly widely used in Europe and America (usually for vagrants and petty offenders), early 14c., from stock (n.1), because they consisted of large wooden blocks.
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