Etymology
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jolt-head (n.)
"a stupid head," 1530s; later also "a big, clumsy, stupid person." The origin and signification of jolt here is unknown.
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decker (adj.)

in combinations, "having a (specified) number of decks," originally of vessels, 1795, from deck (n.). Later of stacked sandwiches.

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bell-boy (n.)
also bellboy, from bell (n.) + boy; originally (1851) a ship's bell-ringer, later (1861) a hotel page.
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buccal (adj.)

"pertaining to the cheek," 1813, from Latin bucca "cheek," especially when puffed out (later "mouth"); see bouche.

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trait (n.)

late 15c., "shot, missiles;" later "a stroke in drawing, a short line" (1580s), from French trait "line, stroke, feature, tract," from Latin tractus "drawing, drawing out, dragging, pulling," later "line drawn, feature," from past participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Sense of "particular feature, distinguishing quality" in English is first recorded 1752.

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meet (n.)

1831 in the sporting sense, "a gathering of huntsmen for fox-hunting," from meet (v.). Later of bicyclists gathering for a ride, etc.

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ice-box (n.)
also icebox, 1839, "an ice chest," later "the small compartment in a refrigerator containing the ice," from ice (n.) + box (n.).
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pancake (v.)
"to squeeze flat," 1879, from pancake (n.). Later, of aircraft, "to fall flat" (1911), with figurative extension. Related: Pancaked; pancaking.
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stout (n.)
1670s, "strong beer or ale," from stout (adj.). Later especially, and now usually, "porter of extra strength" (by 1762).
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tiff (n.)
1727, "outburst of temper," later "petty quarrel" (1754), of uncertain origin; OED suggests imitative, "from the sound of a slight puff of air or gas."
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