Etymology
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lasciviousness (n.)
1590s, from lascivious + -ness. An earlier noun form was lascivity (c. 1500); a later one was lascivency (1660s).
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warhead (n.)
also war-head, 1898, "explosive part of a torpedo," from war (n.) + head (n.). Later transferred to any missile (1944).
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complimentary (adj.)

1620s, "intended to express or convey a compliment," from compliment (n.) + -ary. In later use loosely meaning "free of charge."

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half-dime (n.)
U.S. silver coin minted from 1792 to 1873; originally half-disme; later form by 1800; from half + dime.
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theist (n.)
1660s, from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ist. The original senses was that later reserved to deist: "one who believes in a transcendent god but denies revelation." Later in 18c. theist was contrasted with deist, as believing in a personal God and allowing the possibility of revelation.
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replay (v.)

by 1862, in sporting jargon (curling), "to play (a match) again," from re- "again" + play (v.). Of sound recordings (later video, etc.), "reproduce what has been recorded," by 1912. Related: Replayed; replaying.

The noun is from 1895 as "a replayed match" in sports. The meaning "action of replaying" a sound recording, film, later also video, etc., is by 1953.

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trait (n.)

late 15c., "shot, missiles;" later "a stroke in drawing, a short line" (1580s), from French trait "line, stroke, feature, tract," from Latin tractus "drawing, drawing out, dragging, pulling," later "line drawn, feature," from past participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Sense of "particular feature, distinguishing quality" in English is first recorded 1752.

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jolt-head (n.)
"a stupid head," 1530s; later also "a big, clumsy, stupid person." The origin and signification of jolt here is unknown.
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decker (adj.)

in combinations, "having a (specified) number of decks," originally of vessels, 1795, from deck (n.). Later of stacked sandwiches.

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bell-boy (n.)
also bellboy, from bell (n.) + boy; originally (1851) a ship's bell-ringer, later (1861) a hotel page.
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